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Author Pradeepkumar, A. S. ♦ Mohan, Sailesh ♦ Gopalakrishnan, P. ♦ Sarma, P. S. ♦ Thankappan, K. R. ♦ Nichter, M.
Source Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences & Technology
Content type Text
Publisher National Medical Journal of India
File Format PDF
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Incidence & prevention of disease
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms ♦ Psychiatry and Psychology ♦ Environment and Public Health ♦ Health Care
Subject Keyword Public Health
Abstract Background. We reviewed the literature on tobacco use in Kerala and present data from three recently conducted unpublished studies.Methods. Three cross-sectional studies were conducted; a community-based study of 1298 individuals aged 15 years and above (mean age 37.4 years, men 630), a school-based study of 132 3 boys (mean age 14.7 years), and a college-based study of 1254 male students (mean age 18.2 years). Information on tobacco use and sociodemographic variables was collected using pre-tested, structured interview schedules and questionnaires.Results. In the community study, 72% of men and 6% of women had ever used tobacco. Compared to men with > 12 years of schooling, those with <5 years of schooling were 7 times more likely to smoke (OR 7, Cl 3.2-15.6). The age at initiation of smoking was 19 years among those <25 years of age compared to 25.5 years among ever smokers >44 years. In the school study, the age at initiation among boys aged: 13 years was 10.7 years compared with 13.2 years among 2:16-year-old boys. Boys whose fathers and friends used tobacco were 2 times and 2.9 times more likely to use tobacco (OR 2.0, Cl 1.3-3.1 and OR 2.9, Cl 1.6-5.1), respectively, compared with their counterparts. In the college study, 29% of the commerce students used tobacco compared with 5.3% of polytechnic students (p<0.001).Conclusion. Survey data suggest that the age at initiation of tobacco use appears to be failing. A series of cross-sectional studies with larger sample sizes of the youth is required to confirm this impression. Tobacco use habits of fathers and peers are significant influences on youth smoking. There is a need to focus on particular types of colleges as these appear to have high-risk tobacco use environments.
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Educational Framework Medical Council of India (MCI)
Journal NATIONAL MEDICAL JOURNAL OF INDIA
Volume Number 18
Issue Number 3
Page Count 6
Starting Page 148
Ending Page 153