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Author Schmidt, H. ♦ Mueller, M. ♦ Braun, H. F.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword PHYSICS ♦ IRON SILICIDES ♦ SUPERCONDUCTIVITY ♦ THULIUM SILICIDES ♦ ANTIFERROMAGNETISM ♦ MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ♦ MAGNETIZATION ♦ PRESSURE DEPENDENCE ♦ TRANSITION TEMPERATURE ♦ CURIE-WEISS LAW ♦ MAGNETIC MOMENTS ♦ PHASE STUDIES ♦ REENTRANT SUPERCONDUCTORS
Abstract The compound Tm{sub 2}Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 5} is the only known reentrant superconductor in which superconductivity is destroyed at the antiferromagnetic transition. Widely differing behavior has been reported in the literature regarding the occurrence of superconductivity ranging from transition temperatures around 1.7 K at atmospheric pressure to no superconductivity except under applied hydrostatic pressure. In order to clarify this situation, we carried out ac-susceptibility measurements under applied pressure and magnetization measurements as a function of phase composition within the homogeneity range of the compound and on multiphase samples. For single-phase samples, {ital T}{sub {ital c}} decreases strongly in the whole pressure range with growing stoichiometric ratio Fe/Si. For multiphase samples, a shift of the {ital T}{sub {ital c}} vs pressure curves to lower pressure values was observed. The high-temperature part of the susceptibility follows a Curie-Weiss law independent of phase composition which amounts to an effective magnetic moment per Tm atom of 7.0{mu}{sub {ital B}}. With our results we are able to explain all the observed sample dependence of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} with a combination of substitution effects in the homogeneity range of this compound and internal stress effects caused by impurity phases. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}
ISSN 01631829
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1996-05-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Physical Review, B: Condensed Matter
Volume Number 53
Issue Number 18


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