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Author Menin, C. ♦ Bojnik, E. ♦ Del Bianco, P. ♦ Elefanti, L. ♦ Gianesin, K. ♦ Keppel, S. ♦ Stagni, C. ♦ Mocellin, S. ♦ Vecchiato, A. ♦ De Rossi, A.
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell (on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists)
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Technology ♦ Medicine & health
Abstract BACKGROUND: Several pieces of evidence indicate that a complex relationship exists between constitutional telomere length (TL) and the risk of cutaneous melanoma. Although the general perception is that longer telomeres increase melanoma risk, some studies do not support this association. We hypothesize that discordant data are due to the characteristics of the studied populations. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the association of TL with familial and sporadic melanoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: TL was measured by multiplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction in leukocytes from 310 patients with melanoma according to familial/sporadic and single/multiple cancers and 216 age-matched controls. RESULTS: Patients with sporadic melanoma were found to have shorter telomeres compared with those with familial melanoma. In addition, shorter telomeres, while tending to reduce the risk of familial melanoma regardless of single or multiple tumours, nearly trebled the risk of single sporadic melanoma. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first time that TL has been correlated to opposite effects on melanoma risk according to the presence or absence of familial predisposition. Individual susceptibility to melanoma should be taken into account when assessing the role of TL as a risk factor.
Description Country affiliation: Italy
Author Affiliation: Menin C ( Immunology and Molecular Oncology Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology, IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128, Padova, Italy. chiara.menin@ioveneto.it.); Bojnik E ( Section of Oncology and Immunology, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, 35128, Padova, Italy.); Del Bianco P ( Clinical Trials and Biostatistics Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology, IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128, Padova, Italy.); Elefanti L ( Immunology and Molecular Oncology Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology, IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128, Padova, Italy.); Gianesin K ( Section of Oncology and Immunology, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, 35128, Padova, Italy.); Keppel S ( Immunology and Molecular Oncology Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology, IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128, Padova, Italy.); Stagni C ( Section of Oncology and Immunology, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, 35128, Padova, Italy.); Mocellin S ( Surgery Branch, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, 35128, Padova, Italy.); Vecchiato A ( Oncology Surgery Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology, IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128, Padova, Italy.); De Rossi A ( Immunology and Molecular Oncology Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology, IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128, Padova, Italy.)
ISSN 00070963
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-11-01
Publisher Place Great Britain (UK)
e-ISSN 13652133
Journal British Journal of Dermatology
Volume Number 175
Issue Number 5


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Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus