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Subject Keyword APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES ♦ RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY ♦ ANIMAL TISSUES ♦ BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY ♦ BONE JOINTS ♦ COMPUTER CODES ♦ ELECTRIC FIELDS ♦ IMPLANTS ♦ JOINTS ♦ NMR IMAGING ♦ PATIENTS ♦ RADIOTHERAPY ♦ SENSORS
Abstract Purpose: Heating of patients or burning of biological tissues around medical implants by RF power during MRI scan is a significant patient safety concern. The purpose of this study is to not only measure SAR values, but also RF-induced temperature elevation due to artificial hip joints during MRI scans. Methods: SAR measurement experiment was performed on three discrete manufacturers at 1.5 and 3T. Three MRI RF sequences (T1w TSE, T2w inversion recovery, and T2w TSE) with imaging parameters were selected. A gelled saline phantom mimicking human body tissue was made (Fig.1). FDTD method was utilized to calculate the SAR distribution using Sim4Life software. Based on the results of the simulation, 4 electrical field (E-field) sensors were located around two artificial hip joints inside the phantom. 56 Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensors (28 sensors on each artificial hip joint) were located on both left and right artificial hip joints to measure temperature change during MRI scan (Fig.1). Both E-field and FBG temperature sensors were calibrated with traceability at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). Results: Simulation shows that high SAR values occur in the head and tail of the implanted artificial hip joints (Fig.1 lower right). 3T MRI scanner shows that the local averaged-SAR values measured by probe 1, 2, and 3 are 2.30, 2.77, and 1.68 W/kg, compared to MRI scanner-reported whole body SAR value (≤1.5 W/kg) for T1w TSE and T2w-IR (Table 1). The maximum temperature elevation measured by FBG sensors is 1.49°C at 1.5 T, 2.0°C at 3 T, and 2.56°C at 3 T for T1w TSE, respectively (Table 2). Conclusion: It is essential to assess the safety of MRI system for patient with medical implant by measuring not only accurate SAR deposited in the body, but also temperature elevation due to the deposited SAR during clinical MRI.
ISSN 00942405
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-06-15
Publisher Place United States
Journal Medical Physics
Volume Number 43
Issue Number 6


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