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Author Vecchiola, Aymeric ♦ Chrétien, Pascal ♦ Schneegans, Olivier ♦ Mencaraglia, Denis ♦ Houzé, Frédéric ♦ Delprat, Sophie ♦ Bouzehouane, Karim ♦ Seneor, Pierre ♦ Mattana, Richard ♦ Tatay, Sergio ♦ Geffroy, Bernard
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS ♦ ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY ♦ CARBON NANOTUBES ♦ EQUIPMENT ♦ OPTIMIZATION ♦ PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECT ♦ PROBES ♦ THICKNESS ♦ THIN FILMS
Abstract An imaging technique associating a slowly intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a home-made multi-purpose resistance sensing device is presented. It aims at extending the widespread resistance measurements classically operated in contact mode AFM to broaden their application fields to soft materials (molecular electronics, biology) and fragile or weakly anchored nano-objects, for which nanoscale electrical characterization is highly demanded and often proves to be a challenging task in contact mode. Compared with the state of the art concerning less aggressive solutions for AFM electrical imaging, our technique brings a significantly wider range of resistance measurement (over 10 decades) without any manual switching, which is a major advantage for the characterization of materials with large on-sample resistance variations. After describing the basics of the set-up, we report on preliminary investigations focused on academic samples of self-assembled monolayers with various thicknesses as a demonstrator of the imaging capabilities of our instrument, from qualitative and semi-quantitative viewpoints. Then two application examples are presented, regarding an organic photovoltaic thin film and an array of individual vertical carbon nanotubes. Both attest the relevance of the technique for the control and optimization of technological processes.
ISSN 00036951
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-06-13
Publisher Place United States
Journal Applied Physics Letters
Volume Number 108
Issue Number 24


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