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Author Hylko, J. M.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY ♦ NUCLEAR ENERGY ♦ PUBLIC OPINION ♦ COMMUNICATIONS ♦ PUBLIC ANXIETY ♦ ATTITUDES ♦ ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
Abstract The environmental movement is composed of a variety of groups ranging from very large, bureaucratic, and well-funded institutes to unaffiliated grass-root organizations with little or no pay, no perks, and little hierarchical structure. Independent of structure, both types of organizations share a basic philosophical ideal, which is, due to environmental necessity, that an uncompromising position on the environment is needed. However, to accomplish their goals, bureaucratic and grass-root organizations have evolved their own distinctive and often conflicting operating philosophies. The philosophies are composed of varying degrees of two elements: wilderness fundamentalism and professionalism. Incorporating criticisms from an insider who has worked full time on wilderness issues for more than 20 yr, this paper reviews the way that these two elements are challenging basic philosophical ideals among bureaucratic and grass-roots organizations.
ISSN 0003018X
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1997-12-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Transactions of the American Nuclear Society
Volume Number 77
Technical Publication No. CONF-971125-


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