Thumbnail
Access Restriction
Subscribed

Author Verghese, Ben ♦ Devine, Scott ♦ Gupta, Anoop ♦ Rosenblum, Mendel
Source ACM Digital Library
Content type Text
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
File Format PDF
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Computer science, information & general works ♦ Data processing & computer science
Abstract The dominant architecture for the next generation of shared-memory multiprocessors is CC-NUMA (cache-coherent non-uniform memory architecture). These machines are attractive as compute servers because they provide transparent access to local and remote memory. However, the access latency to remote memory is 3 to 5 times the latency to local memory. CC-NOW machines provide the benefits of cache coherence to networks of workstations, at the cost of even higher remote access latency. Given the large remote access latencies of these architectures, data locality is potentially the most important performance issue. Using realistic workloads, we study the performance improvements provided by OS supported dynamic page migration and replication. Analyzing our kernel-based implementation, we provide a detailed breakdown of the costs. We show that sampling of cache misses can be used to reduce cost without compromising performance, and that TLB misses may not be a consistent approximation for cache misses. Finally, our experiments show that dynamic page migration and replication can substantially increase application performance, as much as 30%, and reduce contention for resources in the NUMA memory system.
Description Affiliation: Computer Systems Laboratory, Stanford University, CA (Verghese, Ben; Devine, Scott; Gupta, Anoop; Rosenblum, Mendel)
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1975-04-01
Publisher Place New York
Journal ACM SIGOPS Operating Systems Review (OPSR)
Volume Number 30
Issue Number 5
Page Count 11
Starting Page 279
Ending Page 289


Open content in new tab

   Open content in new tab
Source: ACM Digital Library