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Author Pick, M. ♦ Démoulin, P. ♦ Zucca, P. ♦ Lecacheux, A. ♦ Stenborg, G.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY ♦ COMPRESSION ♦ DETECTION ♦ ELECTRONS ♦ EMISSION ♦ EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ♦ INTERACTIONS ♦ MASS ♦ MICROWAVE RADIATION ♦ SOLAR CORONA ♦ SOLAR WIND ♦ SUN ♦ VISIBLE RADIATION ♦ WAVELENGTHS ♦ X RADIATION
Abstract In spite of the wealth of imaging observations at the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV), X-ray, and radio wavelengths, there are still relatively few cases where all of the imagery is available to study the full development of a coronal mass ejection (CME) event and its associated shock. The aim of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the role of the coronal environment in the development of CMEs and the formation of shocks, and their propagation. We have analyzed the interactions of a couple of homologous CME events with ambient coronal structures. Both events were launched in a direction far from the local vertical, and exhibited a radical change in their direction of propagation during their progression from the low corona into higher altitudes. Observations at EUV wavelengths from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory were used to track the events in the low corona. The development of the events at higher altitudes was followed by the white-light coronagraphs on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory . Radio emissions produced during the development of the events were well recorded by the Nançay solar instruments. Thanks to their detection of accelerated electrons, the radio observations are an important complement to the EUV imaging. They allowed us to characterize the development of the associated shocks, and helped to unveil the physical processes behind the complex interactions between the CMEs and ambient medium (e.g., compression, reconnection).
ISSN 0004637X
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-05-20
Publisher Place United States
Journal Astrophysical Journal
Volume Number 823
Issue Number 1


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