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Author Duncan, B. N. ♦ Chameides, W. L.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES ♦ NITROGEN COMPOUNDS ♦ OXYGEN COMPOUNDS ♦ PHOTOCHEMISTRY ♦ CHEMICAL REACTIONS ♦ REACTION KINETICS ♦ COMBUSTION ♦ URBAN AREAS ♦ EMISSION ♦ AIR POLLUTION CONTROL ♦ PLUMES ♦ TROPOSPHERE ♦ ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY ♦ OZONE ♦ NITROGEN OXIDES ♦ BOUNDARY LAYERS ♦ PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS ♦ CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS ♦ CHEMICAL COMPOSITION ♦ COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION
Abstract An urban plume model is used to simulate the photochemistry of ozone (O{sub 3}) precursors and the concomitant generation of O{sub 3} within an urban plume as it advects and mixes with the background atmosphere. On the basis of these calculations, we estimate the rates at which O{sub 3} and its precursor compounds are exported to the background atmosphere and how these export rates are affected by various control strategies that might be implemented to reduce maximum O{sub 3} concentrations within the urban plume. Two model cities with different chemical characteristics are considered: case 1, where peak O{sub 3} concentrations during extreme air pollution episodes are more sensitive to nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}=NO+NO{sub 2}) and case 2, where peak O{sub 3} concentrations during these episodes are more sensitive to volatile organic compounds (VOC). The model is first run for extreme meteorological conditions conducive to the generation of high O{sub 3} concentrations to determine the most effective emission control strategies for reducing peak O{sub 3} under these conditions. The model is then run for more typical meteorological conditions, to determine how these various emission control scenarios might affect the export of O{sub 3} and its precursors from the urban to the rural and background atmosphere. The export of O{sub 3} from the urban atmosphere is found to be more sensitive to NO{sub x} emissions, even for case 2 where VOC emission controls more effectively reduced peak O{sub 3} during pollution episodes. The impact of VOC and NO{sub x} emission reductions on the export of primary and secondary O{sub 3} precursor compounds is more complex, leading to reductions in the export of some species and enhancements in the export of others. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union
ISSN 01480227
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1998-11-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Journal of Geophysical Research
Volume Number 103
Issue Number D21


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