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Author Takei, Takayuki ♦ Aokawa, Ryuta ♦ Shigemitsu, Takamasa ♦ Kawakami, Koei ♦ Yoshida, Masahiro
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Elsevier
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Chemistry & allied sciences ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Physiology & related subjects ♦ Biochemistry ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Human anatomy, cytology, histology ♦ Human physiology ♦ Pharmacology and therapeutics ♦ Diseases ♦ Chemical engineering ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Cells ♦ Anatomy ♦ Eukaryota ♦ Organisms ♦ Neoplasms ♦ Diseases ♦ Inorganic Chemicals ♦ Enzymes and Coenzymes ♦ Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins ♦ Chemicals and Drugs ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Equipment and Supplies ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Physical Phenomena ♦ Biological Sciences
Subject Keyword Discipline Biomedical Engineering ♦ Discipline Microbiology ♦ Argon ♦ Cells, Immobilized ♦ Tissue Engineering ♦ Methods ♦ Tissue Scaffolds ♦ Chemistry ♦ Animals ♦ Cell Line ♦ Cell Line, Tumor ♦ Gelatin ♦ Hepatoblastoma ♦ Pathology ♦ Humans ♦ Male ♦ Mice ♦ Mice, Nude ♦ Porosity ♦ Transglutaminases ♦ Metabolism ♦ Journal Article ♦ Research Support, Non-u.s. Gov't
Abstract Design of porous scaffolds in tissue engineering field was challenging. Uniform immobilization of cells in the scaffolds with high porosity was essential for homogeneous tissue formation. The present study was aimed at fabricating uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds with porosity >74% using the gas-in-liquid foam templating technique. To this end, we used gelatin, microbial transglutaminase and argon gas as a scaffold material, cross-linker of the protein and porogen of scaffold, respectively. We confirmed that a porosity of >74% could be achieved by increasing the gas volume delivered to a gelatin solution. Pore size in the scaffold could be controlled by stirring speed, stirring time and the pore size of the filter through which the gas passed. The foaming technique enabled us to uniformly immobilize a human hepatoblastoma cell line in scaffold. Engraftment efficiency of the cell line entrapped within the scaffold in nude mice was higher than that of cells in free-form. These results showed that the uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds were promising for tissue engineering.
Description Author Affiliation: Takei T ( Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan. Electronic address: takei@cen.kagoshima-u.ac.jp.); Aokawa R ( Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0385, Japan. Electronic address: breeze21.1220@hotmail.co.jp.); Shigemitsu T ( Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan. Electronic address: k7918268@kadai.jp.); Kawakami K ( Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0385, Japan. Electronic address: jjdjq118@ybb.ne.jp.); Yoshida M ( Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan. Electronic address: myoshida@cen.kagoshima-u.ac.jp.)
ISSN 13891723
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2015-11-01
Publisher Place Japan
e-ISSN 13474421
Journal Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering
Volume Number 120
Issue Number 5


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus