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Author Anand, L.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword MATERIALS SCIENCE ♦ DEFORMATION ♦ SHEAR ♦ STEELS ♦ SHEAR PROPERTIES ♦ STRAINS ♦ AGING ♦ FLOW STRESS ♦ MATERIALS TESTING ♦ PLASTICITY ♦ STATIC LOADS ♦ STRESS INTENSITY FACTORS ♦ ALLOYS ♦ IRON ALLOYS ♦ IRON BASE ALLOYS ♦ MECHANICAL PROPERTIES ♦ STRESSES ♦ TESTING ♦ Metals & Alloys- Mechanical Properties
Abstract In spite of the frequency with which shear bands have been observed in inelastically deforming solids (e.g. metals, metallic glasses, polymeric glasses, granular and rock-like materials) and the attention that has been given to their study, our state of understanding of the various features of the shear band localization phenomenon appears to be in its infancy. In what follows the authors review the recent experimental work of Anand and Spitzig who have conducted systematic experiments and made quantitative comparisons between experimental observations of certain features of shear localization and corresponding theoretical predictions obtained from anaylses in the framework provided by the analytical developments of Hill and Hutchinson, Rudnicki and Rice, and Rice. This theoretical framework views the initiation of localized shear bands as a bifurcation of deformation in a previously homogeneously deforming homogeneous and rate-independent elastic-plastic body. As has been emphasized by Rice, not all localization phenomena can be expected to fit within this theoretical framework. In particular, a bifurcation analysis cannot take into account the important role of material inhomogeneitiesin initiating shear bands. Also, it cannot handle situations where localization is precipitated by the sudden onset of new physical mechanisms which abruptly degrade the strength of a material (e.g. the Luders band type of localizations which are usually attributed either to the rapid multiplication of new dislocations in metals with initially low dislocation densities or to the sudden breaking free of dislocations from impurity atmospheres in some alloys). dependent on the details of the constitutive equations used in the analysis.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1984-05-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Scr. Metall.
Volume Number 18
Issue Number 5
Organization Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts


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