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Author Hirai, H. ♦ Kondo, K. ♦ Kim, M. ♦ Koinuma, H. ♦ Kurashima, K. ♦ Bando, Y.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword MATERIALS SCIENCE ♦ DIAMONDS ♦ SYNTHESIS ♦ SURFACE ENERGY ♦ OPACITY ♦ CERAMICS ♦ IMPACT SHOCK ♦ COMPRESSION ♦ HARDNESS ♦ FULLERENES ♦ CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ♦ TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
Abstract Transparent nanocrystalline diamond ceramics, consisting of a few nanometer-sized diamond crystallites that are unstable in themselves because of higher surface energy, were fabricated successfully from C{sub 60} fullerene using a shock compression and rapid quenching technique. The platelets were transparent and very hard, nearly comparable to type IIa diamond. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that individual crystallites had combined directly or through a very thin and modified sp{sup 3} carbon layer, which possibly stabilized the nanometer-sized crystallites. The size order and sp{sup 3} configuration of the nanotexture caused the transparency and hardness of the present material. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}
ISSN 00036951
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1997-11-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Applied Physics Letters
Volume Number 71
Issue Number 20


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