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Author Li, Wei ♦ Sigley, Justin ♦ Baker, Stephen R. ♦ Helms, Christine C. ♦ Kinney, Mary T. ♦ Pieters, Marlien ♦ Brubaker, Peter H. ♦ Cubcciotti, Roger ♦ Guthold, Martin
Editor Rouwkema, Jeroen
Source Hindawi
Content type Text
Publisher Hindawi
File Format PDF
Copyright Year ©2017
Language English
Abstract The major structural component of a blood clot is a meshwork of fibrin fibers. It has long been thought that the internal structure of fibrin fibers is homogeneous; that is, the protein density and the bond density between protofibrils are uniform and do not depend on fiber diameter. We performed experiments to investigate the internal structure of fibrin fibers. We formed fibrin fibers with fluorescently labeled fibrinogen and determined the light intensity of a fiber, I, as a function of fiber diameter, D. The intensity and, thus, the total number of fibrin molecules in a cross-section scaled as D1.4. This means that the protein density (fibrin per cross-sectional area), ρp, is not homogeneous but instead strongly decreases with fiber diameter as D-0.6. Thinner fibers are denser than thicker fibers. We also determined Young’s modulus, Y, as a function of fiber diameter. Y decreased strongly with increasing D; Y scaled as D-1.5. This implies that the bond density, ρb, also scales as D-1.5. Thinner fibers are stiffer than thicker fibers. Our data suggest that fibrin fibers have a dense, well-connected core and a sparse, loosely connected periphery. In contrast, electrospun fibrinogen fibers, used as a control, have a homogeneous cross-section.
ISSN 23146133
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2017-10-10
Rights License This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
e-ISSN 23146141
Journal BioMed Research International
Volume Number 2017
Page Count 13


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