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Author El Dareer, S. M. ♦ Kalin, J. R. ♦ Tillery, K. F.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT. ♦ BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ♦ HALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS ♦ INTESTINAL ABSORPTION ♦ METABOLISM ♦ TISSUE DISTRIBUTION ♦ CARBON 14 COMPOUNDS ♦ INGESTION ♦ INTRAVENOUS INJECTION ♦ LIVER ♦ METABOLITES ♦ RATS ♦ TRACER TECHNIQUES ♦ ABSORPTION ♦ ANIMALS ♦ AROMATICS ♦ BODY ♦ DIGESTIVE SYSTEM ♦ DISTRIBUTION ♦ GLANDS ♦ INJECTION ♦ INTAKE ♦ ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS ♦ LABELLED COMPOUNDS ♦ MAMMALS ♦ ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ♦ ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS ♦ ORGANS ♦ RODENTS ♦ UPTAKE ♦ VERTEBRATES ♦ Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology ♦ Metabolism- Tracer Techniques
Abstract The disposition of /sup 14/C-labeled decabromobiphenyl ether (DBBE) in male Fischer rats dosed by feeding (0.025-5.0% of the diet) or intravenously (1 mg/kg) was determined. For rats dosed by feeding, intestinal absorption of DBBE was evident in that the intact compound was present in extracts of liver. For these rats, the size of the liver increased with increasing concentration of DBBE in the diet. Liver contained a maximum of 0.449% of the administered radioactivity at 24 h after feeding rats a diet containing 0.0277% (/sup 14/C)DBBE; no other organ or tissue contained more than 0.26%. The total amount of radioactivity found in tissues was less than 1% of the dose. Of the radioactivity recovered in the feeding experiments, more than 99% was in the feces and gut contents at 72 h; a maximum of 0.012% of the dose was in the urine. In the feces of rats fed (/sup 14/C)DBBE, there were three metabolites, which together comprised 1.5-27.9% of the radioactivity. Since absorption was minimal, most of the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)DBBE apparently took place in the gastrointestinal tract. The metabolites increased in percent of total radioactivity with the content of DBBE in the diet, an indication that enzyme induction in intestinal bacteria may have occurred at the higher doses. More extensive metabolism of (/sup 14/C)DBBE occurred after intravenous administration; only 37% of the radioactivity in the feces was unchanged DBBE. At 72 h after dosing, fecal excretion accounted for 70% of the dose; only 0.129% appeared in the urine. Muscle retained 12.9% and skin 7.25% of the radioactivity administered. In 4 h, rats with biliary cannulas excreted in the bile 7.17% of the intravenously administered radioactivity; less than 1% was excreted as intact DBBE. Biliary excretion was apparently the major route for elimination of the intravenously administered compound.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1987-01-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal J. Toxicol. Environ. Health
Volume Number 22
Issue Number 4
Organization Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL


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