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Author Imura, K. ♦ Fujibuchi, T. ♦ Hirata, H. ♦ Kaneko, K. ♦ Hamada, E.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES ♦ RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY ♦ COMPUTER GRAPHICS ♦ CORRECTIONS ♦ ERRORS ♦ MEDICAL PERSONNEL ♦ PATIENTS ♦ PHANTOMS ♦ RADIOTHERAPY ♦ SKIN ♦ TRAINING ♦ WOUNDS
Abstract Purpose: Patient set-up skills in radiotherapy treatment room have a great influence on treatment effect for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, we have developed the training system for improving practical set-up skills considering rotational correction in the virtual environment away from the pressure of actual treatment room by using three-dimensional computer graphic (3DCG) engine. Methods: The treatment room for external beam radiotherapy was reproduced in the virtual environment by using 3DCG engine (Unity). The viewpoints to perform patient set-up in the virtual treatment room were arranged in both sides of the virtual operable treatment couch to assume actual performance by two clinical staffs. The position errors to mechanical isocenter considering alignment between skin marker and laser on the virtual patient model were displayed by utilizing numerical values expressed in SI units and the directions of arrow marks. The rotational errors calculated with a point on the virtual body axis as the center of each rotation axis for the virtual environment were corrected by adjusting rotational position of the body phantom wound the belt with gyroscope preparing on table in a real space. These rotational errors were evaluated by describing vector outer product operations and trigonometric functions in the script for patient set-up technique. Results: The viewpoints in the virtual environment allowed individual user to visually recognize the position discrepancy to mechanical isocenter until eliminating the positional errors of several millimeters. The rotational errors between the two points calculated with the center point could be efficiently corrected to display the minimum technique mathematically by utilizing the script. Conclusion: By utilizing the script to correct the rotational errors as well as accurate positional recognition for patient set-up technique, the training system developed for improving patient set-up skills enabled individual user to indicate efficient positional correction methods easily.
ISSN 00942405
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-06-15
Publisher Place United States
Journal Medical Physics
Volume Number 43
Issue Number 6


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