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Author Abulfotuh, F. ♦ Balcioglu, A. ♦ Friedman, D. ♦ Geisz, J. ♦ Kurtz, S.
Sponsorship USDOE
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword MATERIALS SCIENCE ♦ ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES ♦ NITROGEN COMPOUNDS ♦ ARSENIC COMPOUNDS ♦ SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES ♦ GALLIUM COMPOUNDS ♦ INDIUM COMPOUNDS ♦ NITRIDES ♦ ARSENIDES ♦ DEEP LEVEL TRANSIENT SPECTROSCOPY ♦ ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE ♦ CRYSTAL DEFECTS ♦ PHOTOCONDUCTIVITY
Abstract This paper presents and discusses the first Deep-Level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) data obtained from measurements carried out on both Schottky barriers and homojunction devices of GaInNAs. The effect of N and In doping on the electrical properties of the GaNInAs devices, which results in structural defects and interface states, has been investigated. Moreover, the location and densities of deep levels related to the presence of N, In, and N+In are identified and correlated with the device performance. The data confirmed that the presence of N alone creates a high density of shallow hole traps related to the N atom and structural defects in the device. Doping by In, if present alone, also creates low-density deep traps (related to the In atom and structural defects) and extremely deep interface states. On the other hand, the co-presence of In and N eliminates both the interface states and levels related to structural defects. However, the device still has a high density of the shallow and deep traps that are responsible for the photocurrent loss in the GaNInAs device, together with the possible short diffusion length. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}
ISSN 0094243X
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1999-03-01
Publisher Department National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Publisher Place United States
Volume Number 462
Issue Number 1
Technical Publication No. CONF-980935-
Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory