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Author Matarese, S. L. ♦ Matthews, J. I.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT. ♦ ZINC ♦ INHALATION ♦ TOXICITY ♦ ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE ♦ HEALTH HAZARDS ♦ INJURIES ♦ LUNGS ♦ PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES ♦ ZINC CHLORIDES ♦ BODY ♦ CHLORIDES ♦ CHLORINE COMPOUNDS ♦ ELEMENTS ♦ HALIDES ♦ HALOGEN COMPOUNDS ♦ HAZARDS ♦ INTAKE ♦ METALS ♦ ORGANS ♦ RESPIRATORY SYSTEM ♦ ZINC COMPOUNDS ♦ ZINC HALIDES ♦ Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987)
Abstract Physicians, military and civilian alike, may be called upon to recognize, treat, and provide long-term care to patients who have suffered a zinc chloride (smoke bomb) inhalational injury. Pathologic changes described in the literature include laryngeal, tracheal, and bronchial mucosal edema and ulceration; interstitial edema; interstitial fibrosis; alveolar obliteration; and bronchiolitis obliterans. Acute injury is associated with a high mortality. Following is a report of a patient with a zinc chloride smoke injury which resulted in subpleural emphysematous blebs complicated by pneumothorax and abnormal exercise physiology. Gradual recovery occurred over several months. However, the chest roentgenogram remains abnormal with emphysematous blebs.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1986-02-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Chest
Volume Number 2
Organization Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX


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