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Author Sutherland, R. J.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS ♦ ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY ♦ NUCLEAR POWER ♦ ECONOMICS ♦ POWER GENERATION ♦ COST ESTIMATION ♦ COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS ♦ COMPETITION ♦ COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS ♦ FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS ♦ NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS ♦ REGIONAL ANALYSIS ♦ NUCLEAR FACILITIES ♦ POWER ♦ POWER PLANTS ♦ THERMAL POWER PLANTS ♦ Nuclear Power Plants- Economics ♦ Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy
Abstract The historical and projected benefits of nuclear power are estimated as the cost differential between nuclear power and an alternative baseload generating source times the quantity of electricity generated. From 1976 through 1981 coal and nuclear power were close competitors in most regions, with nuclear power holding a small cost advantage overall in 1976 and 1977 that subsequently eroded. When nuclear power costs are contrasted to coal power costs, national benefits from nuclear power are estimated to be $336 million from 1976 to 1981, with an additional $1.8 billion for the present value of existing plants. Fuel oil has been the dominant source of baseload generation in California, Florida, and New England. When nuclear power costs are contrasted to those of fuel oil, the benefits of nuclear power in these three regions are estimated to be $8.3 billion and $28.1 billion in terms of present value. The present value of benefits of future nuclear plants is estimated to be $8.2 billion under a midcase scenario and $43 billion under an optimistic scenario. 18 references, 10 tables.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1985-01-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Energy Syst. Policy
Volume Number 9
Issue Number 1
Organization Los Alamos National Lab., NM


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