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Author Töpfer, Lars ♦ Menk, Mario ♦ Weber-Carstens, Steffen ♦ Spies, Claudia ♦ Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter ♦ Uhrig, Alexander ♦ Lojewski, Christian ♦ Jörres, Achim ♦ Deja, Maria
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Elsevier
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Social sciences ♦ Social problems & services; associations ♦ Social welfare problems & services ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Microorganisms, fungi & algae ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Human anatomy, cytology, histology ♦ Pharmacology and therapeutics ♦ Diseases ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Respiratory System ♦ Anatomy ♦ Eukaryota ♦ Viruses ♦ Organisms ♦ Bacterial Infections and Mycoses ♦ Virus Diseases ♦ Respiratory Tract Diseases ♦ Diseases ♦ Diagnosis ♦ Therapeutics ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Persons ♦ Persons ♦ Health Care Facilities, Manpower, and Services ♦ Health Care
Subject Keyword Discipline Critical Care ♦ Influenza A Virus, H1n1 Subtype ♦ Influenza, Human ♦ Complications ♦ Pneumonia ♦ Etiology ♦ Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult ♦ Adult ♦ Community-acquired Infections ♦ Physiopathology ♦ Therapy ♦ Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation ♦ Female ♦ Hospitalization ♦ Humans ♦ Intensive Care Units ♦ Lung ♦ Male ♦ Middle Aged ♦ Pulmonary Gas Exchange ♦ Physiology ♦ Respiration, Artificial ♦ Methods ♦ Retrospective Studies ♦ Journal Article
Abstract PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to compare H1N1-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with ARDS due to other causes of severe community-acquired pneumonia focusing on pulmonary function. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective data analysis of adult ARDS patients between January 2009 and December 2010 in an ARDS referral center. Patient characteristics, severity of illness scores, modalities, and duration of extracorporeal lung support were evaluated as well as intensive care unit stay and survival. Parameters of mechanical ventilation and pulmonary function were analyzed on day of admission and over the consecutive 10 days using a nonparametric analysis of longitudinal data in a 2-factorial design. In a logistic regression analysis, risk factors for extracorporeal lung support were investigated. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients with H1N1-ARDS and 41 with non-H1N1-ARDS were identified. Gas exchange was more severely impaired in patients with H1N1-ARDS over course of time. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was more frequently needed in H1N1-ARDS. Despite significantly prolonged weaning off extracorporeal lung support and intensive care unit stay in H1N1 patients, the proportion of survivors did not differ significantly. Only Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment score could be identified as an independent predictor of extracorporeal lung support. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical course of H1N1-ARDS is substantially different from non-H1N1-ARDS. Affected patients may require extensive therapy including extracorporeal lung support in ARDS referral centers.
Description Country affiliation: Germany
Author Affiliation: Töpfer L ( Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Campus Charité Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin, Germany.); Menk M ( Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Campus Charité Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin, Germany.); Weber-Carstens S ( Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Campus Charité Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin, Germany.); Spies C ( Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Campus Charité Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin, Germany.); Wernecke KD ( SOSTANA GmbH, Berlin, Germany.); Uhrig A ( Department of Infectious Diseases and Pulmonary Medicine, Campus Charité Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charité Mitte, Charitéplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin, Germany.); Lojewski C ( Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin, Germany.); Jörres A ( Department of Nephrology and Medical Intensive Care, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin, Germany.); Deja M ( Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Campus Charité Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: maria.deja@charite.de.)
ISSN 08839441
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2014-06-01
Publisher Place United States
e-ISSN 15578615
Journal Journal of Critical Care
Volume Number 29
Issue Number 3


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus