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Author Uneson, Marcus
Source ACM Digital Library
Content type Text
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
File Format PDF
Copyright Year ©2014
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Computer science, information & general works ♦ Data processing & computer science
Subject Keyword Transformation-based learning ♦ Brill tagging ♦ Computational linguistics ♦ Error-driven rule learning ♦ Natural language processing ♦ Sequential classification ♦ Supervised learning
Abstract Transformation-based learning (TBL) is a machine learning method for, in particular, sequential classification, invented by Eric Brill [Brill 1993b, 1995a]. It is widely used within computational linguistics and natural language processing, but surprisingly little in other areas. TBL is a simple yet flexible paradigm, which achieves competitive or even state-of-the-art performance in several areas and does not overtrain easily. It is especially successful at catching local, fixed-distance dependencies and seamlessly exploits information from heterogeneous discrete feature types. The learned representation—an ordered list of transformation rules—is compact and efficient, with clear semantics. Individual rules are interpretable and often meaningful to humans. The present article offers a survey of the most important theoretical work on TBL, addressing a perceived gap in the literature. Because the method should be useful also outside the world of computational linguistics and natural language processing, a chief aim is to provide an informal but relatively comprehensive introduction, readable also by people coming from other specialities.
ISSN 03600300
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2014-04-01
Publisher Place New York
e-ISSN 15577341
Journal ACM Computing Surveys (CSUR)
Volume Number 46
Issue Number 4
Page Count 51
Starting Page 1
Ending Page 51


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Source: ACM Digital Library