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Author Kye-Duodu, Gideon ♦ Nortey, Priscillia ♦ Malm, Keziah ♦ Nyarko, Kofi Mensah ♦ Sackey, Samuel Oko ♦ Ofori, Sampson ♦ Afari, Edwin Andrews
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher African Field Epidemiology Network
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Technology ♦ Medicine & health
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Hepatitis B and HIV infections are endemic in sub-Saharan Africa including Ghana. Understanding the extent of the co-infection is critical to the optimal care of persons living with HIV and AIDS (PLHIV). We determined the prevalence and risk factors of HBV co-infection in PLHIV and assessed the knowledge of health care workers (HCW) in Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) clinics regarding the co-infection. METHODS: A cross sectional study was conducted in five ART clinics to obtain data from a systematic random sample of PLHIV in the Eastern region of Ghana from March to June 2012. We used self-administered questionnaires to assess knowledge of HCW on knowledge and management of the co-infection. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used for analysis at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Of 320 PLHIV recruited into study, with median age of 40 years (IQR: 33-50 years), 28 tested positive for HBsAg giving an overall prevalence of 8.8%. There were significant associations between HBV infection and being an adult (p=0.004), increasing serum ALT levels (p=0.002) and partner with history of HBV infection (p=0.010). HCW obtained 84.2% (SD± 20.53; 95% CI: 89-98.1) and 53.1% (SD± 35.06; 95% CI: 13.0-88.9) in the 'general knowledge' and 'management practice' indexes respectively. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of HBV-HIV co-infection was relatively high among PLHIV in Eastern region. Knowledge of HCW on management practices of HBV-HIV co-infection and HBV vaccination coverage among PLHIV were found to be relatively low. Regular trainings of HCW and a HBV vaccination programme targeted at PLHIV should be considered.
Description Country affiliation: Ghana
Author Affiliation: Kye-Duodu G ( Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (GFELTP), School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13, Accra, Ghana.); Nortey P ( Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13, Accra, Ghana.); Malm K ( Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (GFELTP), School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13, Accra, Ghana.); Nyarko KM ( Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (GFELTP), School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13, Accra, Ghana.); Sackey SO ( Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (GFELTP), School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13, Accra, Ghana.); Ofori S ( Ghana Health Service, Regional Hospital, Koforidua, Eastern Region, Ghana.); Afari EA ( Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (GFELTP), School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13, Accra, Ghana.)
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-01-01
Publisher Place Uganda
e-ISSN 19378688
Journal Pan African Medical Journal
Volume Number 25
Issue Number Suppl 1


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus