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Author George, Libin ♦ Gargiulo, Gaetano Dario ♦ Lehmann, Torsten ♦ Hamilton, Tara Julia
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Computer science, information & general works ♦ Library & information sciences ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Diseases ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Diagnosis ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Equipment and Supplies ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Information Science ♦ Information Science
Subject Keyword Discipline Biotechnology ♦ Electrocardiography, Ambulatory ♦ Instrumentation ♦ Methods ♦ Signal Processing, Computer-assisted ♦ Wireless Technology ♦ Electric Power Supplies ♦ Equipment Design ♦ Journal Article
Abstract Power supply quality and stability are critical for wearable and implantable biomedical applications. For this reason we have designed a reconfigurable switched-capacitor DC-DC converter that, aside from having an extremely small footprint (with an active on-chip area of only 0.04 mm²), uses a novel output voltage control method based upon a combination of adaptive gain and discrete frequency scaling control schemes. This novel DC-DC converter achieves a measured output voltage range of 1.0 to 2.2 V with power delivery up to 7.5 mW with 75% efficiency. In this paper, we present the use of this converter as a power supply for a concept design of a wearable (15 mm × 15 mm) 1-lead ECG front-end sensor device that simultaneously harvests power and communicates with external receivers when exposed to a suitable RF field. Due to voltage range limitations of the fabrication process of the current prototype chip, we focus our analysis solely on the power supply of the ECG front-end whose design is also detailed in this paper. Measurement results show not just that the power supplied is regulated, clean and does not infringe upon the ECG bandwidth, but that there is negligible difference between signals acquired using standard linear power-supplies and when the power is regulated by our power management chip.
Description Country affiliation: Australia
Author Affiliation: George L ( School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. l.george@unsw.edu.au.); Gargiulo GD ( The MARCS Institute, Western Sydney University, Penrith 2751, Australia. l.george@unsw.edu.au.); Lehmann T ( The MARCS Institute, Western Sydney University, Penrith 2751, Australia. g.gargiulo@westernsydney.edu.au.); Hamilton TJ ( School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. t.lehmann@unsw.edu.au.)
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2015-11-19
Publisher Place Switzerland
e-ISSN 14248220
Journal Sensors
Volume Number 15
Issue Number 11


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus