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Author Kaur, Jasmeen ♦ Adamchuk, Viacheslav I. ♦ Whalen, Joann K. ♦ Ismail, Ashraf A.
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Social sciences ♦ Social problems & services; associations ♦ Social welfare problems & services ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Chemistry & allied sciences ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Physiology & related subjects ♦ Biochemistry ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Human physiology ♦ Personal health & safety ♦ Pharmacology and therapeutics ♦ Diseases ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Eukaryota ♦ Organisms ♦ Inorganic Chemicals ♦ Complex Mixtures ♦ Chemical Actions and Uses ♦ Chemicals and Drugs ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Metabolism ♦ Biological Sciences ♦ Natural Science Disciplines ♦ Physical Sciences ♦ Environment and Public Health ♦ Health Care
Subject Keyword Discipline Biotechnology ♦ Biodegradation, Environmental ♦ Biosensing Techniques ♦ Carbon Dioxide ♦ Isolation & Purification ♦ Soil Pollutants ♦ Toxicity ♦ Cell Respiration ♦ Drug Effects ♦ Gasoline ♦ Humans ♦ Soil Microbiology ♦ Chemistry ♦ Spectrophotometry, Infrared ♦ Journal Article
Abstract The eco-toxicological indicators used to evaluate soil quality complement the physico-chemical criteria employed in contaminated site remediation, but their cost, time, sophisticated analytical methods and in-situ inapplicability pose a major challenge to rapidly detect and map the extent of soil contamination. This paper describes a sensor-based approach for measuring potential (substrate-induced) microbial respiration in diesel-contaminated and non-contaminated soil and hence, indirectly evaluates their microbial activity. A simple CO2 sensing system was developed using an inexpensive non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) CO2 sensor and was successfully deployed to differentiate the control and diesel-contaminated soils in terms of CO2 emission after glucose addition. Also, the sensor system distinguished glucose-induced CO2 emission from sterile and control soil samples (p ≤ 0.0001). Significant effects of diesel contamination (p ≤ 0.0001) and soil type (p ≤ 0.0001) on glucose-induced CO2 emission were also found. The developed sensing system can provide in-situ evaluation of soil microbial activity, an indicator of soil quality. The system can be a promising tool for the initial screening of contaminated environmental sites to create high spatial density maps at a relatively low cost.
Description Country affiliation: Canada
Author Affiliation: Kaur J ( Department of Bioresource Engineering, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada. jasmeen.kaur@mail.mcgill.ca.); Adamchuk VI ( Department of Bioresource Engineering, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada. viacheslav.adamchuk@mcgill.ca.); Whalen JK ( Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada. joann.whalen@mcgill.ca.); Ismail AA ( Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada. ashraf.ismail@mail.mcgill.ca.)
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2015-02-26
Publisher Place Switzerland
e-ISSN 14248220
Journal Sensors
Volume Number 15
Issue Number 3


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus