Thumbnail
Access Restriction
Open

Author Schneller, Mikkel B. ♦ Pedersen, Mogens T. ♦ Gupta, Nidhi ♦ Aadahl, Mette ♦ Holtermann, Andreas
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Philosophy & psychology ♦ Psychology ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Physiology & related subjects ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Human physiology ♦ Incidence & prevention of disease ♦ Diseases ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Eukaryota ♦ Organisms ♦ Diagnosis ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms ♦ Psychiatry and Psychology ♦ Metabolism ♦ Musculoskeletal and Neural Physiological Phenomena ♦ Biological Sciences ♦ Persons ♦ Persons
Subject Keyword Discipline Biotechnology ♦ Energy Metabolism ♦ Heart Rate ♦ Physiology ♦ Motor Activity ♦ Walking ♦ Accelerometry ♦ Adult ♦ Calorimetry, Indirect ♦ Female ♦ Humans ♦ Male ♦ Monitoring, Ambulatory ♦ Oxygen Consumption ♦ Telemetry ♦ Young Adult ♦ Journal Article
Abstract We compared the accuracy of five objective methods, including two newly developed methods combining accelerometry and activity type recognition (Acti4), against indirect calorimetry, to estimate total energy expenditure (EE) of different activities in semi-standardized settings. Fourteen participants performed a standardized and semi-standardized protocol including seven daily life activity types, while having their EE measured by indirect calorimetry. Simultaneously, physical activity was quantified by an ActivPAL3, two ActiGraph GT3X+'s and an Actiheart. EE was estimated by the standard ActivPAL3 software (ActivPAL), ActiGraph GT3X+ (ActiGraph) and Actiheart (Actiheart), and by a combination of activity type recognition via Acti4 software and activity counts per minute (CPM) of either a hip- or thigh-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ (AGhip + Acti4 and AGthigh + Acti4). At group level, estimated physical activities EE by Actiheart (MSE = 2.05) and AGthigh + Acti4 (MSE = 0.25) were not significantly different from measured EE by indirect calorimetry, while significantly underestimated by ActiGraph, ActivPAL and AGhip + Acti4. AGthigh + Acti4 and Actiheart explained 77% and 45%, of the individual variations in measured physical activity EE by indirect calorimetry, respectively. This study concludes that combining accelerometer data from a thigh-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ with activity type recognition improved the accuracy of activity specific EE estimation against indirect calorimetry in semi-standardized settings compared to previously validated methods using CPM only.
Description Country affiliation: Denmark
Author Affiliation: Schneller MB ( Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. ngu@nrcwe.dk.); Pedersen MT ( National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ngu@nrcwe.dk.); Gupta N ( Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. mtpedersen@nexs.ku.dk.); Aadahl M ( National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ngu@nrcwe.dk.); Holtermann A ( Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. metaad01@regionh.dk.)
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2015-03-13
Publisher Place Switzerland
e-ISSN 14248220
Journal Sensors
Volume Number 15
Issue Number 3


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus