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Author Adams, J. U. ♦ Andrews, J. S. ♦ Hiller, J. M. ♦ Simon, E. J. ♦ Holtzman, S. G.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ♦ BIOLOGICAL STRESS ♦ BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ♦ ENDORPHINS ♦ BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS ♦ RECEPTORS ♦ MORPHINE ♦ LIGANDS ♦ RATS ♦ RESPONSE MODIFYING FACTORS ♦ TRACER TECHNIQUES ♦ TRITIUM COMPOUNDS ♦ ALKALOIDS ♦ ANALGESICS ♦ ANIMALS ♦ AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM AGENTS ♦ CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DEPRESSANTS ♦ DRUGS ♦ ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS ♦ KINETICS ♦ LABELLED COMPOUNDS ♦ MAMMALS ♦ MEMBRANE PROTEINS ♦ NARCOTICS ♦ NEUROREGULATORS ♦ OPIUM ♦ ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ♦ PROTEINS ♦ REACTION KINETICS ♦ RODENTS ♦ VERTEBRATES ♦ Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques
Abstract This study was essentially an in vivo protection experiment designed to test further the hypothesis that stress induces release of endogenous opiods which then act at opioid receptors. Rats that were either subjected to restraint stress for 1 yr or unstressed were injected ICV with either saline or 2.5 ..mu..g of ..beta..-funaltrexamine (..beta..-FNA), an irreversible opioid antagonist that alkylates the mu-opioid receptor. Twenty-four hours later, subjects were tested unstressed for morphine analgesia or were sacrificed and opioid binding in brain was determined. (/sup 3/H)D-Ala/sup 2/NMePhe/sup 4/-Gly/sup 5/(ol)enkephalin (DAGO) served as a specific ligand for mu-opioid receptors, and (/sup 3/H)-bremazocine as a general ligand for all opioid receptors. Rats injected with saline while stressed were significantly less sensitive to the analgesic action of morphine 24 hr later than were their unstressed counterparts. ..beta..-FNA pretreatment attenuated morphine analgesia in an insurmountable manner. Animals pretreated with ..beta..-FNA while stressed were significantly more sensitive to the analgesic effect of morphine than were animals that received ..beta..-FNA while unstressed. ..beta..-FNA caused small and similar decreases in (/sup 3/H)-DAGO binding in brain of both stressed and unstressed animals. 35 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1987-12-28
Publisher Place United States
Journal Life Sci.
Volume Number 41
Issue Number 26
Organization Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA


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