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Author Valle, Luca F. ♦ Jagsi, Reshma ♦ Bobiak, Sarah N. ♦ Zornosa, Carrie ♦ D.'Amico, Thomas A. ♦ Pisters, Katherine M. ♦ Dexter, Elisabeth U. ♦ Niland, Joyce C. ♦ Hayman, James A. ♦ Kapadia, Nirav S.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE ♦ BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY ♦ DECISION MAKING ♦ DISEASE INCIDENCE ♦ LUNGS ♦ NEOPLASMS ♦ PATIENTS ♦ RADIOTHERAPY ♦ SURGERY
Abstract Purpose: This study determined practice patterns in the staging and treatment of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions. Secondary aims were to determine trends in the use of definitive therapy, predictors of treatment type, and acute adverse events associated with primary modalities of treatment. Methods and Materials: Data from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Oncology Outcomes Database from 2007 to 2011 for US patients with stage I NSCLC were used. Main outcome measures included patterns of care, predictors of treatment, acute morbidity, and acute mortality. Results: Seventy-nine percent of patients received surgery, 16% received definitive radiation therapy (RT), and 3% were not treated. Seventy-four percent of the RT patients received stereotactic body RT (SBRT), and the remainder received nonstereotactic RT (NSRT). Among participating NCCN member institutions, the number of surgeries-to-RT course ratios varied between 1.6 and 34.7 (P<.01), and the SBRT-to-NSRT ratio varied between 0 and 13 (P=.01). Significant variations were also observed in staging practices, with brain imaging 0.33 (0.25-0.43) times as likely and mediastinoscopy 31.26 (21.84-44.76) times more likely for surgical patients than for RT patients. Toxicity rates for surgical and for SBRT patients were similar, although the rates were double for NSRT patients. Conclusions: The variations in treatment observed among NCCN institutions reflects the lack of level I evidence directing the use of surgery or SBRT for stage I NSCLC. In this setting, research of patient and physician preferences may help to guide future decision making.
ISSN 03603016
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-02-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics
Volume Number 94
Issue Number 2


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