Thumbnail
Access Restriction
Open

Author Woosley, S. E. ♦ Herant, M.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword PHYSICS ♦ COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS ♦ NEUTRON STARS ♦ STAR ACCRETION ♦ ACCRETION DISKS ♦ X RADIATION ♦ SUPERNOVAE ♦ RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY ♦ COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION
Abstract When a neutron star is born with a large {open_quote}{open_quote}kick,{close_quote}{close_quote} it overtakes and captures a portion of its own ejecta. Especially in massive stars, material in the immediate vicinity of the neutron star has been decelerated by hydrodynamic interaction with the stellar mantle. This material is clumpy owing to an ongoing Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Capture of a clump provides the neutron star with an accretion disk of mass M{approximately}10{sup {minus}4}M{sub {circle_dot}} and specific angular momentum {approximately}10{sup 20} ergs. Magnetic interaction with the inner part of this disk slows the rotation of the neutron star while the outer part forms planetesimals, chiefly composed of silicates, at {approximately}10{sup 13} cm. Accretion of these planetesimals, could in principle give rise to gamma-ray bursts, but there is a severe problem with tidal disruption in the accretion process for all but the smallest impact parameters. Unless the gamma-ray burst is focused into a small solid angle, the model is too inefficient. More likely it gives rise to many faint hard x-ray transients. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}
ISSN 0094243X
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1996-04-01
Publisher Place United States
Volume Number 366
Issue Number 1
Technical Publication No. CONF-9503269-


Open content in new tab

   Open content in new tab