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Author Puglisi, Giovanni ♦ Stanco, Filippo ♦ Barone, Germana ♦ Mazzoleni, Paolo
Source ACM Digital Library
Content type Text
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
File Format PDF
Copyright Year ©2015
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Computer science, information & general works ♦ Data processing & computer science
Subject Keyword Thin section analysis ♦ Cultural heritage ♦ Image alignment ♦ Petrographic features ♦ Pottery
Abstract The microscopic description of ancient pottery is widely used for the fabric definition, classification and provenance assessment. In most cases, however, the description is qualitative. An improvement of the study of archaeological pottery needs a more objective approach with quantitative analysis. In classical scientific literature, the structural features and mineralogical composition of pottery are carried out on thin sections by means of transmitted polarized light microscope. The determination were obtained through observations with and without cross polarizator (nicols). The quantitative measurements are normally achieved with tedious and time consuming table with point counter. In this article the attention has been focused on the automatic identification of structural and textural components of the potteries through optical microscopy. Image analysis techniques have been then used to automatically classify the image components. Results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach: petrographic data collection becomes faster with respect to the traditional method providing also quantitative information useful for fabric recognition.
ISSN 15564673
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2015-03-09
Publisher Place New York
e-ISSN 15564711
Journal Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)
Volume Number 8
Issue Number 3
Page Count 13
Starting Page 1
Ending Page 13


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Source: ACM Digital Library