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Author Heller, C. M. ♦ Campbell, I. H. ♦ Laurich, B. K. ♦ Smith, D. L. ♦ Bradley, D. D. ♦ Burn, P. L. ♦ Ferraris, J. P. ♦ Muellen, K.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword MATERIALS SCIENCE ♦ POLYMERS ♦ OPTICAL PROPERTIES ♦ DILUTION ♦ ABSORPTION SPECTRA ♦ EMISSION SPECTRA ♦ PHOTOLUMINESCENCE ♦ TIME RESOLUTION ♦ DECAY ♦ OLIGOMERS
Abstract We present measurements of the optical absorption and emission properties of poly({ital p}-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) -related materials focusing on the differences between molecules isolated by dispersion in an inert host and concentrated molecular films. Optical absorption spectra, photoluminescence (PL) spectra, PL efficiency, and time-resolved PL spectra of dilute blends of PPV oligomers with 2{endash}5 phenylene-phenyl rings are compared with those of dense oligomer and polymer films. In dilute oligomer-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blends with high PL efficiency, the PL decay is exponential, independent of both temperature and oligomer length. This implies that the fundamental radiative lifetime of PPV oligomers is essentially independent of oligomer length. Concentrated spin-cast oligomer films and polymers have a faster and strongly temperature-dependent PL decay that approaches that of the dilute oligomer results at low temperature. The differences in PL decay correspond to changes in PL efficiency. The efficiency of the oligomer-PMMA blend is high and only weakly temperature dependent, whereas that of concentrated films is lower and strongly temperature dependent, decreasing by more than a factor of 3 from 10 to 350 K. The quenching of the PL efficiency in concentrated films is due to migration to extrinsic, impurity related centers as opposed to an intrinsic intermolecular recombination process. The PL spectrum of a dilute oligomer blend redshifts substantially, both as the excitation energy is decreased and as the emission time increases. This spectral redshift is due to disorder-induced site-to-site variation and not to diffusion to lower-energy sites. In contrast, no spectral shift with excitation energy or emission time was observed for dense oligomer films. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}
ISSN 01631829
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1996-08-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Physical Review, B: Condensed Matter
Volume Number 54
Issue Number 8


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