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Author Bryant, R. D. ♦ Jansen, W. ♦ Boivin, J. ♦ Laishley, E. J. ♦ Costerton, J. W.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword MATERIALS SCIENCE ♦ PETROLEUM ♦ BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ♦ PIPELINES ♦ CORROSION ♦ SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA ♦ ENZYME ACTIVITY ♦ BIODEGRADATION ♦ OXIDOREDUCTASES ♦ STEELS ♦ ALLOYS ♦ BACTERIA ♦ CHEMICAL REACTIONS ♦ DECOMPOSITION ♦ ENERGY SOURCES ♦ ENZYMES ♦ FOSSIL FUELS ♦ FUELS ♦ IRON ALLOYS ♦ IRON BASE ALLOYS ♦ MICROORGANISMS ♦ ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ♦ PROTEINS 360105* -- Metals & Alloys-- Corrosion & Erosion ♦ PetroleumTransport, Handling, & Storage ♦ Biochemistry
Abstract The importance of hydrogenase activity to corrosion of steel was assessed by using mixed populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from corroded and noncorroded oil pipelines. Biofilms which developed on the steel studs contained detectable numbers of sulfate-reducing bacteria (10{sup 4} increasing to 10{sup 7}/0.5 cm{sup 2}). However, the biofilm with active hydrogenase activity (i.e., corrosion pipeline organisms), as measured by a semiquantitative commercial kit, was associated with a significantly higher corrosion rate (7.79 mm/year) relative to noncorrosive biofilm (0.48 mm/year) with 10{sup 5} sulfate-reducing bacteria per 0.5 cm{sup 2} but no measurable hydrogenase activity. The importance of hydrogenase and the microbial sulfate-reducing bacterial population making up the biofilm are discussed relative to biocorrosion.
ISSN 00992240
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1991-10-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume Number 57
Issue Number 10


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