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Author Shapiro, M. M. ♦ Stiller, B. ♦ O.'Dell, F. W.
Sponsorship USDOE
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS ♦ ALPHA PARTICLES ♦ COSMIC RADIATION ♦ GEOPHYSICS ♦ HELIUM ♦ HYDROGEN ♦ IONIZATION ♦ MAGNETIC FIELDS ♦ MEASURED VALUES ♦ NUCLEAR EMULSIONS ♦ PARTICLE TRACKS ♦ PROTONS ♦ QUANTITY RATIO ♦ SLOWDOWN ♦ STRATOSPHERE
Abstract The abundance of elements in primary cosmic radiation and the nature of their energy spectra is of great cosmological interest. The intensity of the helium component is fairly well known from investigations north of 40 deg geomagnetic latitude. Until recently the flux of primary belium near the geomagnetic equator was not well known. Extensive work on primary helium was done by means of flights in Minnesota and in the vicinity of White Sands, New Mexico. The main flux for the helium component at White Sands (41 deg North latitude) is 90 plus or minus 3 peters. There has been a scarcity of data at very low latitudes. ln 1950 Singer found an upper limit of (14 plus or minus 20) peters. The flux of helium was measured in a stack of stripped emulsion exposed in the stratosphere near the geomagnetic equator off the Galapagor Islands in 1953. The emulsion stack remained above 90,000 feet for six bours. Of nearly 1200 tracks finally chosen for study, 328 had to be attributed to relativistic helium nuclei on the basis of their ionization vs. range. Because of the uncertainty in the absolute primary fluxes of hydrogen at various latitudes, it does not appear feasible at present to give a definitive figure for the relative abundance of helium and hydrogen in cosmic radiation. (A.C.)
ISSN 00296341
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1958-01-01
Publisher Department U.S. Naval Research Lab., Washington
Journal Nuovo Cimento
Volume Number 8
Issue Number Suppl 2
Organization U.S. Naval Research Lab., Washington


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