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Author Moulder, J. E. ♦ Foster, K. R.
Sponsorship USDOE
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES ♦ BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES ♦ ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY ♦ CARCINOGENESIS ♦ CORRELATIONS ♦ NEOPLASMS ♦ RISK ASSESSMENT ♦ EPIDEMIOLOGY ♦ BIOLOGICAL MODELS ♦ ELECTRIC UTILITIES ♦ SAFETY ANALYSIS ♦ ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS ♦ BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ♦ ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE ♦ BIOPHYSICS ♦ DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS ♦ TOXICITY ♦ GENETIC EFFECTS ♦ ELECTRICITY ♦ ELECTRIC POWER
Abstract There is a widespread public perception that exposure to electricity is linked to cancer. The public concern stems largely from epidemiological studies which appear to show a relationship between cancer incidence and exposure to power-frequency electromagnetic fields. This review will discuss the biophysics of power-frequency electromagnetic fields as it relates to biological effects, summarize the current state of the cancer epidemiology, and then concentrate on the laboratory studies that are relevant to addressing the possibility that power-frequency fields are carcinogenic. Review of the epidemiological evidence shows that the association between exposure to power-frequency fields and cancer is weak and inconsistent, and generally fails to show a dose-response relationship. The laboratory studies of power-frequency field show little evidence of the type of effects on cells or animals that point towards power-frequency fields causing or contributing to cancer. Finally, from what is known about the biophysics of power-frequency fields, there is no reason to even suspect that they would cause or contribute to cancer. Application of {open_quotes}Hill`s criteria{close_quotes} to epidemiological and laboratory studies shows that the evidence for a causal association between exposure to power-frequency fields and the incidence of cancer is weak. 127 refs., 7 tabs.
ISSN 00379727
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1995-09-01
Publisher Place United States
Volume Number 209
Issue Number 4


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