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Author Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke ♦ Kubo, Masahito ♦ Katsukawa, Yukio ♦ Kano, Ryouhei ♦ Narukage, Noriyuki ♦ Ishikawa, Ryohko ♦ Bando, Takamasa ♦ Winebarger, Amy ♦ Kobayashi, Ken ♦ Trujillo Bueno, Javier ♦ Auchère, Frédéric
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY ♦ CAPTURE ♦ CHROMOSPHERE ♦ COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS ♦ EMISSION ♦ HEATING ♦ IMAGES ♦ LYMAN LINES ♦ OPTICAL SYSTEMS ♦ PHOTOSPHERE ♦ POLARIMETERS ♦ SENSITIVITY ♦ SOUND WAVES ♦ SPECTRA ♦ SUN ♦ SUNSPOTS ♦ ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION
Abstract The Chromospheric Ly α SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket experiment launched on 2015 September 3 to investigate the solar chromosphere and transition region. The slit-jaw (SJ) optical system captured Ly α images with a high time cadence of 0.6 s. From the CLASP/SJ observations, many variations in the solar chromosphere and transition region emission with a timescale of <1 minute were discovered. In this paper, we focus on the active region within the SJ field of view and investigate the relationship between short (<30 s) temporal variations in the Ly α emission and the coronal structures observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). We compare the Ly α temporal variations at the coronal loop footpoints observed in the AIA 211 Å (≈2 MK) and AIA 171 Å (≈0.6 MK) channels with those in the regions with bright Ly α features without a clear association with the coronal loop footpoints. We find more short (<30 s) temporal variations in the Ly α intensity in the footpoint regions. Those variations did not depend on the temperature of the coronal loops. Therefore, the temporal variations in the Ly α intensity at this timescale range could be related to the heating of the coronal structures up to temperatures around the sensitivity peak of 171 Å. No signature was found to support the scenario that these Ly α intensity variations were related to the nanoflares. Waves or jets from the lower layers (lower chromosphere or photosphere) are possible causes for this phenomenon.
ISSN 0004637X
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2017-09-10
Publisher Place United States
Journal Astrophysical Journal
Volume Number 846
Issue Number 2


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