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Author Wheaton, Anne G. ♦ Pleasants, Roy A. ♦ Croft, Janet B. ♦ Ohar, Jill A. ♦ Heidari, Khosrow ♦ Mannino, David M. ♦ Liu, Yong ♦ Strange, Charlie
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Taylor & Francis
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Diseases
Subject Keyword Discipline Pulmonology
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess relationships between obstructive lung diseases, respiratory symptoms, and comorbidities by gender. METHODS: Data from 12 594 adult respondents to the 2012 South Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System telephone survey were used. Five categories of chronic obstructive airway disease (OAD) were defined: former asthma only, current asthma only, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) only, asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS), and none. Associations of these categories with respiratory symptoms (frequent productive cough, shortness of breath, and impaired physical activities due to breathing problems), overall health, and comorbidities were assessed using multivariable logistic regression for men and women. RESULTS: Overall, 16.2% of men and 18.7% of women reported a physician diagnosis of COPD and/or asthma. Former asthma only was higher among men than women (4.9% vs. 3.2%, t-test p = 0.008). Current asthma only was more prevalent among women than men (7.2% vs. 4.7%, p < 0.001), as was ACOS (4.0% vs. 2.2%, p < 0.001). Having COPD only did not differ between women (4.3%) and men (4.4%). Adults with ACOS were most likely to report the 3 respiratory symptoms. COPD only and ACOS were associated with higher likelihoods of poor health and most comorbidities for men and women. Current asthma only was also associated with these outcomes among women, but not among men. CONCLUSIONS: In this large population-based sample, women were more likely than men to report ACOS and current asthma, but not COPD alone. Gender differences were evident between the OAD groups in sociodemographic characteristics, respiratory symptoms, and comorbidities, as well as overall health.
Description Country affiliation: United States
Author Affiliation: Wheaton AG ( a Division of Population Health , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Atlanta , GA , USA.); Pleasants RA ( b Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine , Duke University School of Medicine , Durham , NC , USA.); Croft JB ( a Division of Population Health , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Atlanta , GA , USA.); Ohar JA ( c Section on Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy & Immunologic Disease , Wake Forest University School of Medicine , Winston Salem , NC , USA.); Heidari K ( d Chronic Disease Epidemiology Office , South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control , Columbia , SC , USA.); Mannino DM ( e Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine , Pulmonary Epidemiology Research Laboratory , University of Kentucky , Lexington , KY , USA.); Liu Y ( a Division of Population Health , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Atlanta , GA , USA.); Strange C ( f Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine , Medical University of South Carolina , Charleston , SC , USA.)
ISSN 02770903
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-09-01
Publisher Place Great Britain (UK)
e-ISSN 15324303
Journal Journal of Asthma
Volume Number 53
Issue Number 7


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Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus