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Author Kamran, Sophia C. ♦ Collier, John M. ♦ Lane, Anne Marie ♦ Kim, Ivana ♦ Niemierko, Andrzej ♦ Chen, Yen-Lin E. ♦ MacDonald, Shannon M. ♦ Munzenrider, John E. ♦ Gragoudas, Evangelos ♦ Shih, Helen A.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE ♦ CARCINOMAS ♦ DEATH ♦ DIAGNOSIS ♦ EYES ♦ HAZARDS ♦ INJURIES ♦ MAMMARY GLANDS ♦ METASTASES ♦ PATIENTS ♦ PROTON BEAMS ♦ RADIATION DOSES ♦ RADIOTHERAPY ♦ RBE ♦ REVIEWS ♦ STANDARD OF LIVING ♦ TOXICITY ♦ VISION
Abstract Purpose/Objective(s): Radiation therapy can be used to treat uveal metastases with the goal of local control and improvement of quality of life. Proton therapy can be used to treat uveal tumors efficiently and with expectant minimization of normal tissue injury. Here, we report the use of proton beam therapy for the management of uveal metastases. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was made of all patients with uveal metastases treated at our institution with proton therapy between June 2002 and June 2012. Patient and tumor characteristics, fractionation and dose schemes, local control, and toxicities are reported. Results: Ninety patients were identified. Of those, 13 were excluded because of missing information. We report on 77 patients with 99 affected eyes with available data. Patients were 68% female, and the most common primary tumor was breast carcinoma (49%). The median age at diagnosis of uveal metastasis was 57.9 years. Serous retinal detachment was seen in 38% of treated eyes. The median follow-up time was 7.7 months. The median dose delivered to either eye was 20 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) in 2 fractions. Local control was 94%. The median survival after diagnosis of uveal metastases was 12.3 months (95% confidence interval, 7.7-16.8). Death in all cases was secondary to systemic disease. Radiation vasculopathy, measured decreased visual acuity, or both was observed in 50% of evaluable treated eyes. The actuarial rate of radiation vasculopathy, measured decreased visual acuity, or both was 46% at 6 months and 73% at 1 year. The 6 eyes with documented local failure were successfully salvaged with retreatment. Conclusions: Proton therapy is an effective and efficient means of treating uveal metastases. Acutely, the majority of patients experience minor adverse effects. For longer-term survivors, the risk of retinal injury with vision loss increases significantly over the first year.
ISSN 03603016
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2014-12-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics
Volume Number 90
Issue Number 5


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