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Author Steiger, W. R. ♦ Matsushita, S.
Sponsorship USDOE
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Language English
Subject Keyword GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS ♦ AURORAE ♦ BETA DECAY ♦ BETA PARTICLES ♦ CONFIGURATION ♦ EARTH ♦ ELECTRONS ♦ EXCITATION ♦ EXPANSION ♦ F-LAYER ♦ ION RECOMBINATION ♦ IONOSPHERE ♦ LEVELS ♦ LIFETIME ♦ LUMINESCENCE ♦ MAGNETIC FIELDS ♦ MEASURED VALUES ♦ NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS ♦ PACIFIC OCEAN ♦ PHOTOGRAPHY ♦ PRODUCTION ♦ SHOCK WAVES ♦ VELOCITY
Abstract A sequence of four photographs of the August 1, 1958, high-altitude nuclear explosion "Teak" near Johnston Island in the Pacific is shown. These photographs were taken from Maui, Hawaii, at an altitude of 3050 meters and 1300 km from the explosion. Three main featares of these photographs are evident and are discussed: an auroral arc directed southward: an expanding envelope; and an airglow cloud. The auroral arc extending southward from the explosion is interpreted as the glow produced by a stream of beta -decay electrons directed along the earth's magnetic field. This arc apparently extended into the southern hemisphere and was observed from Apia, Samoa. The expanding envelope is interpreted as an excitationrecombination phenomenon produced by an expanding shock front. By assuming an average speed of propagation of 1.3 km/sec of the shock front, the times at which the photographs were taken are estimated. The airglow cloud is interpreted as a residue of ionized material having a lifetime estimated at 15 to 30 minutes. Assuming an electron density of 10 times the normal F/sub 2-/region value, an effective recombination coefficient of 10 times the normal F/sub 2/ value is obtained. The airglow cloud ascended at a rate of approximately 1000 m/sec and expanded horizontally at a rate of approximately 300 m/sec.
ISSN 01480227
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1960-02-01
Publisher Department High Altitude Observatory, Climax, Colo.
Journal Journal of Geophysical Research
Volume Number 65
Issue Number 2
Organization High Altitude Observatory, Climax, Colo.


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