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Author Harrison, N. ♦ Mielke, C. H. ♦ Rickel, D. G. ♦ Wosnitza, J. ♦ Qualls, J. S. ♦ Brooks, J. S. ♦ Balthes, E. ♦ Schweitzer, D. ♦ Heinen, I. ♦ Strunz, W.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword MATERIALS SCIENCE ♦ EDDY CURRENTS ♦ ORGANIC SUPERCONDUCTORS ♦ MAGNETIZATION ♦ CHARGED-PARTICLE TRANSPORT ♦ SHUBNIKOV-DE HAAS EFFECT ♦ MAGNETORESISTANCE ♦ HALL EFFECT ♦ MAGNETIC FIELDS ♦ EFFECTIVE MASS ♦ OSCILLATIONS ♦ ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ♦ FERMI LEVEL
Abstract Measurements of both the magnetization and magnetotransport of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}I{sub 3} (BEDT-TTF is bisethylenedithio-tetrathiafulvalene) in magnetic fields extending to 60 T at 0.4 K and 20 T at 35 mK are reported. Strong eddy currents observed in the magnetization are found to exhibit critical currentlike behavior. This might be connected with the breakdown of the quantum Hall effect, as proposed previously for {alpha}-phase salts. The strong two dimensionality leads to an apparent fall of the effective mass together with an overall suppression of the amplitude of the magnetic quantum oscillations at high magnetic fields or very low temperatures. These effects are more pronounced for the Shubnikov{endash}de Haas (SdH) effect but clearly visible also for the de Haas{endash}van Alphen (dHvA) oscillations. The apparent fall of the effective mass and the deviations of the dHvA signal from the behavior predicted by the standard Lifshitz-Kosevich theory can quantitatively be explained by the influence of chemical-potential oscillations on the wave form in a two-dimensional, spin-split Fermi liquid. The much stronger deviations from the conventional behavior in the transport data hint to an additional mechanism unique to the SdH effect. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}
ISSN 01631829
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1998-10-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Physical Review, B: Condensed Matter
Volume Number 58
Issue Number 16


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