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Author Pinder, J. E. III ♦ Smith, M. H. ♦ Boni, A. L.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES ♦ NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS ♦ MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES ♦ FUEL REPROCESSING PLANTS ♦ RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS ♦ PLUTONIUM 238 ♦ ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT ♦ PLUTONIUM 239 ♦ PLUTONIUM 240 ♦ PARTICLE RESUSPENSION ♦ SURFACE CONTAMINATION ♦ TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS ♦ ACTINIDE ISOTOPES ♦ ACTINIDE NUCLEI ♦ ALPHA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES ♦ CONTAMINATION ♦ ECOSYSTEMS ♦ EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI ♦ EVEN-ODD NUCLEI ♦ HEAVY NUCLEI ♦ ISOTOPES ♦ MASS TRANSFER ♦ MATERIALS ♦ NUCLEAR FACILITIES ♦ NUCLEI ♦ PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES ♦ RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS ♦ RADIOACTIVE WASTES ♦ RADIOISOTOPES ♦ WASTES ♦ YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES 510300* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989) ♦ Nuclear FuelsEnvironmental Aspects ♦ Nuclear FuelsWaste Disposal & Storage
Abstract Plutonium inventories were determined in two old-field ecosystems, Fields 1 and 2, located near a nuclear-fuel reprocessing facility that had released approximately 640 mCi (24 GBq) /sup 238/Pu and 570 mCi (21 GBq) /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu to the atmosphere in the 20 yr preceding sampling. Field 1 was 230 m from the point of release (a 62-m stack) and contained 57 nCi (2.1 kBq) /sup 238/Pu/m/sup 2/ and 255 nCi (9.4 kBq) /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu/m/sup 2/. Field 2 was 420 m from the stack and contained 15 nCi (0.56 kBq) /sup 238/Pu/m/sup 2/ and 79 nCi (2.9 kBq) /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu/m/sup 2/. The distribution of Pu between soil and vegetation components was similar in the two fields with only 1.3% of the /sup 238/Pu and 0.2% of the /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu occurring in pines, herbaceous vegetation and litter. More of the Pu could be suspended from the soil into the atmosphere by a 6 m/s wind on Field 1 than on Field 2 due to the lower biomass of herbaceous vegetation and litter on Field 1. Approximately 2% of the /sup 238/Pu and 0.5% of the /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu could be resuspended on Field 1, whereas only 0.5% of the /sup 238/Pu and 0.1% of the /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu could be resuspended on Field 2. Plutonium contamination of the vegetation occurred primarily by (1) direct deposition of recently released Pu onto vegetation, and (2) resuspension of Pu from the soil to vegetation surfaces. Root uptake apparently made negligble contributions to the Pu contents of above-ground vegetation.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1979-12-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal Ecology
Volume Number 60
Issue Number 6
Organization Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC


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