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Author Quandt, Sara A. ♦ Grzywacz, Joseph G. ♦ Trejo, Grisel ♦ Arcury, Thomas A.
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Elsevier
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Social sciences ♦ Social groups ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Physiology & related subjects ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Human physiology ♦ Diseases ♦ Agriculture & related technologies ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Eukaryota ♦ Organisms ♦ Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases ♦ Diseases ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Physiological Phenomena ♦ Biological Sciences ♦ Natural Science Disciplines ♦ Physical Sciences ♦ Technology, Industry, and Agriculture ♦ Technology and Food and Beverages ♦ Persons ♦ Persons ♦ Population Characteristics ♦ Health Care ♦ Geographic Locations ♦ Geographic Locations
Subject Keyword Discipline Medicine ♦ Agriculture ♦ Diet ♦ Family Health ♦ Hispanic Americans ♦ Pediatric Obesity ♦ Prevention & Control ♦ Child, Preschool ♦ Female ♦ Humans ♦ Interviews As Topic ♦ North Carolina ♦ Qualitative Research ♦ Journal Article ♦ Research Support, N.i.h., Extramural
Abstract Obesity and overweight are significant problems for children in the US, particularly for Hispanic children. This paper focuses on the children in families of immigrant Hispanic farmworkers, as farm work is the portal though which many immigrants come to the US. This paper (1) describes a model of the nutritional strategies of child feeding in farmworker families; and (2) uses this model to identify leverage points for efforts to improve the nutritional status of these children. In-depth interviews were conducted in Spanish with 33 mothers of 2-5 year old children in farmworker families recruited in North Carolina in 2010-2011. The purposive sample was balanced by farmworker status (migrant or seasonal), child age, and child gender. Interviews were transcribed and translated. Multiple coders and a team approach to analysis were used. Nutritional strategies centered on domains of procuring food, using food, and maintaining food security. The content of these domains reflected environmental factors (e.g., rural isolation, shared housing), contextual factors (e.g., beliefs about appropriate food, parenting style), and available resources (e.g., income, government programs). Environmental isolation and limited access to resources decrease the amount and diversity of household food supplies. Parental actions (parental sacrifices, reduced dietary variety) attempt to buffer children. Use of government food sources is valuable for eligible families. Leverage points are suggested that would change nutritional strategy components and lower the risk of overweight and obesity. Further prospective research is needed to verify the nutritional strategy identified and to test the ability of leverage points to prevent childhood obesity in this vulnerable population.
Spatial Coverage North Carolina
Description Author Affiliation: Quandt SA ( Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA. Electronic address: squandt@wakehealth.edu.); Grzywacz JG ( Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA); Trejo G ( Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.); Arcury TA ( Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.)
ISSN 02779536
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2014-12-01
Publisher Place Great Britain (UK)
e-ISSN 18735347
Journal Social Science & Medicine
Volume Number 123


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus