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Author Guo, Feng ♦ Zhou, Weijie ♦ Li, Peng ♦ Mao, Zhangming ♦ Yennawar, Neela H. ♦ French, Jarrod B. ♦ Huang, Tony Jun
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Wiley-VCH
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Chemistry & allied sciences ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Physiology & related subjects ♦ Biochemistry ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Human physiology ♦ Pharmacology and therapeutics ♦ Diseases ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins ♦ Chemicals and Drugs ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Physical Phenomena ♦ Biological Sciences ♦ Natural Science Disciplines ♦ Physical Sciences
Subject Keyword Discipline Nanotechnology ♦ Acoustics ♦ Instrumentation ♦ Crystallization ♦ Micromanipulation ♦ Molecular Imprinting ♦ Proteins ♦ Chemistry ♦ Sonication ♦ Equipment Design ♦ Equipment Failure Analysis ♦ Radiation Effects ♦ Ultrastructure ♦ Sound ♦ Journal Article ♦ Research Support, N.i.h., Extramural ♦ Research Support, Non-u.s. Gov't ♦ Research Support, U.s. Gov't, Non-p.h.s.
Abstract Advances in modern X-ray sources and detector technology have made it possible for crystallographers to collect usable data on crystals of only a few micrometers or less in size. Despite these developments, sample handling techniques have significantly lagged behind and often prevent the full realization of current beamline capabilities. In order to address this shortcoming, a surface acoustic wave-based method for manipulating and patterning crystals is developed. This method, which does not damage the fragile protein crystals, can precisely manipulate and pattern micrometer and submicrometer-sized crystals for data collection and screening. The technique is robust, inexpensive, and easy to implement. This method not only promises to significantly increase efficiency and throughput of both conventional and serial crystallography experiments, but will also make it possible to collect data on samples that were previously intractable.
Description Country affiliation: United States
Author Affiliation: Guo F ( Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802, USA.); Zhou W ( Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA.); Li P ( Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802, USA.); Mao Z ( Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802, USA.); Yennawar NH ( Huck Institutes for Life Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802, USA.); French JB ( Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA.); Huang TJ ( Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA.)
ISSN 16136810
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2015-06-01
Publisher Place Germany
e-ISSN 16136829
Journal Small
Volume Number 11
Issue Number 23


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus