Thumbnail
Access Restriction
Open

Author Dillard, Amanda J. ♦ Scherer, Laura ♦ Ubel, Peter A. ♦ Smith, Dylan M. ♦ Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. ♦ McClure, Jennifer B. ♦ Greene, Sarah ♦ Stark, Azadeh ♦ Fagerlin, Angela
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Elsevier
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Philosophy & psychology ♦ Psychology ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Chemistry & allied sciences ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Biochemistry ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Incidence & prevention of disease ♦ Pharmacology and therapeutics ♦ Diseases ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Eukaryota ♦ Organisms ♦ Neoplasms ♦ Diseases ♦ Organic Chemicals ♦ Chemical Actions and Uses ♦ Chemicals and Drugs ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms ♦ Psychiatry and Psychology ♦ Persons ♦ Persons ♦ Geographic Locations ♦ Geographic Locations
Subject Keyword Discipline Medicine ♦ Anticarcinogenic Agents ♦ Therapeutic Use ♦ Anxiety ♦ Psychology ♦ Breast Neoplasms ♦ Prevention & Control ♦ Decision Support Techniques ♦ Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice ♦ Tamoxifen ♦ Aged ♦ Female ♦ Humans ♦ Information Seeking Behavior ♦ Intention ♦ Middle Aged ♦ Risk Assessment ♦ United States ♦ Journal Article ♦ Research Support, N.i.h., Extramural ♦ Research Support, Non-u.s. Gov't ♦ Research Support, U.s. Gov't, Non-p.h.s.
Abstract Few studies have examined how specific emotions may affect decision-making processes. Anxiety may be especially relevant in health decisions such as those related to cancer in which thoughts of illness or death may be abundant. We examined associations between women's anxiety about developing breast cancer and variables related to their decision to take a medication that could reduce their chances of the disease. Six-hundred and thirty-two American women, who had an increased risk of breast cancer, reviewed a web-based decision aid about tamoxifen. We examined associations between their baseline, self-reported anxiety about developing the disease and post decision aid measures including knowledge about tamoxifen, attitude toward the medication, and behavioral intentions to look for more information and take the medication. Results showed that anxiety was not associated with knowledge about tamoxifen, but it was associated with attitude toward the medication such that women who were more anxious about developing breast cancer were more likely to think the benefits were worth the risks. Greater anxiety was also associated with greater behavioral intentions to look for additional information and take the medication in the next few months. Secondary analyses showed that behavioral intentions were related to knowledge of tamoxifen and attitude toward the medication only for women who were reporting low levels of anxiety. Overall, the findings suggest that anxiety about breast cancer may motivate interest in tamoxifen and not necessarily through affecting knowledge or attitudes.
Spatial Coverage United States
Description Country affiliation: United States
Author Affiliation: Dillard AJ ( Department of Psychology, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI 49401, USA. dillaram@gvsu.edu)
ISSN 02779536
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2013-01-01
Publisher Place Great Britain (UK)
e-ISSN 18735347
Journal Social Science & Medicine
Volume Number 77


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus