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Author Broom, Alex ♦ Broom, Jennifer ♦ Kirby, Emma
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Elsevier
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Philosophy & psychology ♦ Psychology ♦ Social sciences ♦ Social problems & services; associations ♦ Social welfare problems & services ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Chemistry & allied sciences ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Biochemistry ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Incidence & prevention of disease ♦ Pharmacology and therapeutics ♦ Diseases ♦ Management & auxiliary services ♦ General management
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Eukaryota ♦ Organisms ♦ Chemical Actions and Uses ♦ Chemicals and Drugs ♦ Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms ♦ Psychological Phenomena and Processes ♦ Psychiatry and Psychology ♦ Natural Science Disciplines ♦ Physical Sciences ♦ Persons ♦ Persons ♦ Health Services Administration ♦ Health Care ♦ Geographic Locations ♦ Geographic Locations
Subject Keyword Discipline Medicine ♦ Anti-bacterial Agents ♦ Therapeutic Use ♦ Choice Behavior ♦ Hospitalists ♦ Psychology ♦ Physician's Practice Patterns ♦ Statistics & Numerical Data ♦ Attitude Of Health Personnel ♦ Australia ♦ Female ♦ Humans ♦ Male ♦ Organizational Culture ♦ Psychological Theory ♦ Qualitative Research ♦ Journal Article
Abstract The prospect of an 'antimicrobial perfect storm' in the coming decades through the emergence and proliferation of multi-resistant organisms has become an urgent public health concern. With limited drug discovery solutions foreseeable in the immediate future, and with evidence that resistance can be ameliorated by optimisation of prescribing, focus currently centres on antibiotic use. In hospitals, this is manifest in the development of stewardship programs that aim to alter doctors' prescribing behaviour. Yet, in many clinical contexts, doctors' antibiotic prescribing continues to elude best practice. In this paper, drawing on qualitative interviews with 30 Australian hospital-based doctors in mid-2013, we draw on Bourdieu's theory of practice to illustrate that 'sub-optimal' antibiotic prescribing is a logical choice within the habitus of the social world of the hospital. That is, the rules of the game within the field are heavily weighted in favour of the management of immediate clinical risks, reputation and concordance with peer practice vis-à-vis longer-term population consequences. Antimicrobial resistance is thus a principal of limited significance in the hospital. We conclude that understanding the habitus of the hospital and the logics underpinning practice is a critical step toward developing governance practices that can respond to clinically 'sub-optimal' antibiotic use.
Spatial Coverage Australia
Description Author Affiliation: Broom A ( School of Social Science, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia. Electronic address: a.broom@uq.edu.au.); Broom J ( Department of Medicine, Nambour Hospital, QLD, Australia. Electronic address: jennifer.broom@health.qld.gov.au.); Kirby E ( School of Social Science, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia. Electronic address: e.kirby@uq.edu.au.)
ISSN 02779536
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2014-06-01
Publisher Place Great Britain (UK)
e-ISSN 18735347
Journal Social Science & Medicine
Volume Number 110


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus