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Author Clair, Matthew ♦ Daniel, Caitlin ♦ Lamont, Michèle
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Elsevier
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Technology ♦ Medicine & health
Abstract Research on the societal-level causes and consequences of stigma has rarely considered the social conditions that account for destigmatization, the process by which a group's worth and status improve. Destigmatization has important implications for the health of stigmatized groups. Building on a robust line of stigma reduction literature in psychology, we develop a sociological framework for understanding how new cultural constructions that draw equivalences and remove blame shape public and structural stigma over time. We examine historical transformations of cultural constructions surrounding three stigmatized groups in the United States: people living with HIV/AIDS, African Americans, and people labeled as obese. By tracing this process across cases, we find that the conditions that account for destigmatization include the credibility of new constructions, the status and visibility of actors carrying these constructions, the conclusiveness of expert knowledge about stigmatized groups, the interaction between new constructions and existing cultural ideologies, and the perceived linked fate of the stigmatized and dominant groups. We also find that the reduction of structural and public forms of stigma often depend on distinct processes and constructions. To conclude, we propose a framework for the comparative study of destigmatization as an essential component of promoting a culture of health.
Description Author Affiliation: Clair M ( Harvard University, Department of Sociology, 641 William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Electronic address: clair@fas.harvard.edu.); Daniel C ( Harvard University, Department of Sociology, 543 William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Electronic address: cdaniel@fas.harvard.edu.); Lamont M ( Harvard University, Department of Sociology, 510 William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Electronic address: mlamont@wjh.harvard.edu.)
ISSN 02779536
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2016-09-01
Publisher Place Great Britain (UK)
e-ISSN 18735347
Journal Social Science & Medicine
Volume Number 165


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus