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Author Wind, Tim R. ♦ Komproe, Ivan H.
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Elsevier
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Philosophy & psychology ♦ Psychology ♦ Social sciences ♦ Sociology & anthropology ♦ Social groups ♦ Social problems & services; associations ♦ Social welfare problems & services ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Physiology & related subjects ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Human physiology ♦ Personal health & safety ♦ Incidence & prevention of disease ♦ Diseases ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Eukaryota ♦ Organisms ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms ♦ Mental Disorders ♦ Psychiatry and Psychology ♦ Physical Phenomena ♦ Biological Phenomena ♦ Biological Sciences ♦ Social Sciences ♦ Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena ♦ Persons ♦ Persons ♦ Population Characteristics ♦ Environment and Public Health ♦ Health Care ♦ Geographic Locations ♦ Geographic Locations
Subject Keyword Discipline Medicine ♦ Disasters ♦ Floods ♦ Social Support ♦ Stress Disorders, Post-traumatic ♦ Epidemiology ♦ Adaptation, Psychological ♦ Adolescent ♦ Adult ♦ Aged ♦ England ♦ Female ♦ Humans ♦ Male ♦ Middle Aged ♦ Multilevel Analysis ♦ Risk Factors ♦ Rural Health ♦ Statistics & Numerical Data ♦ Rural Population ♦ Time Factors ♦ Young Adult ♦ Journal Article ♦ Research Support, Non-u.s. Gov't
Abstract Many scholars have advocated that the time has come to provide empirical evidence of the mechanisms that associate community social capital with individual disaster mental health. For this purpose we conducted a study (n = 232) one year after a flood (2008) in Morpeth, a rural town in northern England. We selected posttraumatic stress as an indicator of disaster mental health. Our multilevel model shows that high community social capital is indirectly salutary for individual posttraumatic stress. In particular, in communities (defined as postcode areas) with high structural social capital, the results suggest that individuals confide in the social context (high cognitive social capital) to address disaster-related demands (high collective efficacy), and employ less individual psychosocial resources (i.e. coping strategies and social support). This 'conservation of individual psychosocial resources' in a salutary social context decreases the association between the appraisal of the disaster and posttraumatic stress. As a result of this mechanism, individuals suffer less from posttraumatic stress in communities with high social capital. These findings provide new insights how intervention policies aimed at strengthening both objective and subjective dimensions of social capital may reduce post-disaster mental health.
Spatial Coverage England
Description Country affiliation: Netherlands
Author Affiliation: Wind TR ( HealthNet TPO, Department of Research and Development, 1074 VJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. twind@healthnettpo.org)
ISSN 02779536
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2012-11-01
Publisher Place Great Britain (UK)
e-ISSN 18735347
Journal Social Science & Medicine
Volume Number 75
Issue Number 9


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus