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Author Antaris, Alexander L. ♦ Yaghi, Omar K. ♦ Hong, Guosong ♦ Diao, Shuo ♦ Zhang, Bo ♦ Yang, Jiang ♦ Chew, Leila ♦ Dai, Hongjie
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Wiley-VCH
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Chemistry & allied sciences ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Physiology & related subjects ♦ Biochemistry ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Human anatomy, cytology, histology ♦ Human physiology ♦ Pharmacology and therapeutics ♦ Diseases ♦ Manufacture for specific uses ♦ Precision instruments & other devices
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Cells ♦ Anatomy ♦ Eukaryota ♦ Organisms ♦ Inorganic Chemicals ♦ Chemicals and Drugs ♦ Diagnosis ♦ Investigative Techniques ♦ Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment ♦ Physical Phenomena ♦ Chemical Phenomena ♦ Biological Sciences
Subject Keyword Discipline Nanotechnology ♦ Imaging, Three-dimensional ♦ Instrumentation ♦ Methods ♦ Nanotubes, Carbon ♦ Chemistry ♦ Silicon ♦ Cell Line, Tumor ♦ Fluorescence ♦ Humans ♦ Hydrogen-ion Concentration ♦ Molecular Imaging ♦ Ultracentrifugation ♦ Journal Article
Abstract Postsynthetic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sorting methods such as density gradient ultracentrifugation, gel chromatography, and electrophoresis have all been inspired by established biochemistry separation techniques designed to separate subcellular components. Biochemistry separation techniques have been refined to the degree that parameters such as pH, salt concentration, and temperature are necessary for a successful separation, yet these conditions are only now being applied to SWCNT separation methodologies. Slight changes in pH produce radically different behaviors of SWCNTs inside a density gradient, allowing for the facile separation of ultrahigh purity (6,4) SWCNTs from as-synthesized carbon nanotubes. The (6,4) SWCNTs are novel fluorophores emitting below ≈900 nm and can be easily detected with conventional silicon-based charge-coupled device detectors without the need for specialized InGaAs cameras. The (6,4) SWCNTs are used to demonstrate their potential as a clinically relevant NIR-I fluorescence stain for the immunohistochemical staining of cells and cancer tissue sections displaying high endothelial growth factor receptor levels.
Description Country affiliation: United States
Author Affiliation: Antaris AL ( Department of Material Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.); Yaghi OK ( Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.); Hong G ( Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.); Diao S ( Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.); Zhang B ( Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.); Yang J ( Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.); Chew L ( Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.); Dai H ( Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.)
ISSN 16136810
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2015-12-16
Publisher Place Germany
e-ISSN 16136829
Journal Small
Volume Number 11
Issue Number 47


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Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus