Thumbnail
Access Restriction
Open

Author Bridle-Fitzpatrick, Susan
Source World Health Organization (WHO)-Global Index Medicus
Content type Text
Publisher Elsevier
File Format HTM / HTML
Language English
Difficulty Level Medium
Subject Domain (in DDC) Philosophy & psychology ♦ Psychology ♦ Social sciences ♦ Sociology & anthropology ♦ Social groups ♦ Natural sciences & mathematics ♦ Life sciences; biology ♦ Natural history of organisms ♦ Technology ♦ Medicine & health ♦ Incidence & prevention of disease ♦ Diseases ♦ Agriculture & related technologies
Subject Domain (in MeSH) Eukaryota ♦ Organisms ♦ Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases ♦ Diseases ♦ Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms ♦ Psychiatry and Psychology ♦ Natural Science Disciplines ♦ Physical Sciences ♦ Social Sciences ♦ Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena ♦ Technology, Industry, and Agriculture ♦ Technology and Food and Beverages ♦ Persons ♦ Persons ♦ Population Characteristics ♦ Health Care ♦ Geographic Locations ♦ Geographic Locations
Subject Keyword Discipline Medicine ♦ Food Supply ♦ Economics ♦ Residence Characteristics ♦ Adolescent ♦ Adult ♦ Commerce ♦ Feeding Behavior ♦ Physiology ♦ Psychology ♦ Female ♦ Health Status Disparities ♦ Humans ♦ Male ♦ Mexico ♦ Middle Aged ♦ Obesity ♦ Prevention & Control ♦ Poverty ♦ Qualitative Research ♦ Social Class ♦ Journal Article ♦ Research Support, Non-u.s. Gov't
Abstract Differential access to healthy foods has been hypothesized to contribute to disparities in eating behaviors and health outcomes. While food deserts have been researched extensively in developed Anglophone countries, evidence from low- and middle-income countries is still scarce. In Mexico, prevalence of obesity is among the highest worldwide. As obesity has increased nationally and become a widespread public health issue, it is becoming concentrated in the low-income population. This mixed-methods study uses a multidimensional approach to analyze food environments in a low-, middle-, and high-income community in a Mexican city. The study advances understanding of the role that food environments may play in shaping eating patterns by analyzing the density and proximity of food outlet types as well as the variety, quantity, quality, pricing, and promotion of different foods. These measures are combined with in-depth qualitative research with families in the communities, including photo elicitation, to assess perceptions of food access. The central aims of the research were to evaluate physical and economic access and exposure to healthy and unhealthy foods in communities of differing socioeconomic status as well as participants' subjective perceptions of such access and exposure. The findings suggest a need to reach beyond a narrow focus on food store types and the distance from residence to grocery stores when analyzing food access. Results show that excessive access and exposure to unhealthy foods and drinks, or 'food swamps,' may be a greater concern than food deserts for obesity-prevention policy in Mexico.
Spatial Coverage Mexico
Description Author Affiliation: Bridle-Fitzpatrick S ( Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver, 2201 S. Gaylord St., Denver, CO 80210, USA. Electronic address: susanbridle@gmail.com.)
ISSN 02779536
Educational Role Student ♦ Teacher
Age Range above 22 year
Educational Use Reading ♦ Research ♦ Self Learning
Interactivity Type Expositive
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2015-10-01
Publisher Place Great Britain (UK)
e-ISSN 18735347
Journal Social Science & Medicine
Volume Number 142


Source: WHO-Global Index Medicus