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Author Webb, W. R. ♦ Gamsu, G. ♦ Stark, D. D. ♦ Moon, K. L. (Jr.) ♦ Moore, E. H.
Source United States Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Content type Text
Language English
Subject Keyword RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE ♦ ADIPOSE TISSUE ♦ IMAGES ♦ CARCINOMAS ♦ MAGNETIC RESONANCE ♦ SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO ♦ MEDIASTINUM ♦ BLOOD VESSELS ♦ PATIENTS ♦ SPIN ECHO ♦ TRACHEA ♦ ANIMAL TISSUES ♦ BODY ♦ BODY AREAS ♦ CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM ♦ CHEST ♦ CONNECTIVE TISSUE ♦ DISEASES ♦ NEOPLASMS ♦ ORGANS ♦ RESONANCE ♦ RESPIRATORY SYSTEM ♦ TISSUES ♦ Medicine- External Radiation in Diagnostics- (1980-)
Abstract Ten patients having a mediastinal tumor were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using from two to four imaging sequences. Seven had bronchial carcinoma and three had benign lesions. The sequences included the spin-echo technique with repetition time (TR) values of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 sec and echo time (TE) values of 28 and 56 msec, and the inversion-recovery technique. The signal-intensity ratios of the mediastinal mass and mediastinal fat, which are a measure of image contrast, were compared for the different imaging sequences. Also signal-to-noise ratios were measured relative to both mediastinal fat and mediastinal mass. With spin-echo imaging, decreasing the TR value resulted in an increase in mass/fat contrast in all patients, making the masses easier to detect, but this also resulted in decreased signal-to-noise ratios. Inversion-recovery imaging with the sequence used resulted in a greatly increased mass/fat contrast, because of a relative decrease in signal from the mass. Spin-echo imaging with both short and long TR values provides good tissue contrast and good signal-to-noise ratios.
Educational Use Research
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 1984-10-01
Publisher Place United States
Journal AJR, Am. J. Roentgenol.
Volume Number 143
Issue Number 4
Organization Univ. of California Medical Center, San Francisco


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