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Author Medina, Gustavo ♦ Flores Martin, Sandra ♦ Fonseca, Belchiolina ♦ Otth, Carola ♦ Fernandez, Heriberto
Source SpringerLink
Content type Text
Publisher Springer Berlin Heidelberg
File Format PDF
Copyright Year ©2014
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Technology ♦ Medicine & health
Subject Keyword Amoeba ♦ Arcobacter ♦ Phagocytosis ♦ Signaling pathways ♦ Medical Microbiology ♦ Microbiology ♦ Immunology
Abstract Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoeba widely found in environmental matrices such as soil and water. Arcobacter butzleri is an emerging potential zoonotic pathogen that can be isolated from environmental water sources, where they can establish endosymbiotic relationships with amoebas. The aim of this study was to describe the implication of mannose-binding proteins and membrane-associated receptors of glucose and galactose present in the amoebic membrane, during the attachment of Arcobacter butzleri by blocking with different saccharides. Another objective was to describe the signaling pathways involved in phagocytosis of these bacteria using specific inhibitors and analyze the implication of phagolysosome formation on the survival of Arcobacter butzleri inside the amoeba. We infer that the attachment of Arcobacter butzleri to the amoeba is a process which involves the participation of mannose-binding proteins and membrane-associated receptors of glucose and galactose present in the amoeba. We also demonstrated an active role of protozoan actin polymerization in the phagocytosis of Arcobacter butzleri and a critical involvement of PI3K and RhoA pathways. Further, we demonstrated that the tyrosine kinase-induced actin polymerization signal is essential in Acanthamoeba-mediated bacterial uptake. Through phagolysosomal formation analysis, we conclude that the survival of Arcobacter butzleri inside the amoeba could be related with the ability to remain inside vacuoles not fused with lysosomes, or with the ability to retard the fusion between these structures. All these results help the understanding of the bacterial uptake mechanisms used by Acanthamoeba castellanii and contribute to evidence of the survival mechanisms of Arcobacter butzleri.
ISSN 09320113
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2014-03-21
Publisher Place Berlin/Heidelberg
e-ISSN 14321955
Journal Parasitology Research
Volume Number 113
Issue Number 5
Page Count 10
Starting Page 1933
Ending Page 1942


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Source: SpringerLink