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Author Souppart, Laetitia ♦ Sanciu, Giovanna ♦ Cian, Amandine ♦ Wawrzyniak, Ivan ♦ Delbac, Frederic ♦ Capron, Monique ♦ Dei Cas, Eduardo ♦ Boorom, Kenneth ♦ Delhaes, Laurence ♦ Viscogliosi, Eric
Source SpringerLink
Content type Text
Publisher Springer-Verlag
File Format PDF
Copyright Year ©2009
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Technology ♦ Medicine & health
Subject Keyword Immunology ♦ Microbiology ♦ Medical Microbiology
Abstract Blastocystis sp. is the most common eukaryotic parasite in the intestinal tract of humans. Due to its strong impact in public health, in this study, we determined the frequency of different Blastocystis subtypes in patients in France. We hypothesized on the mode of transmission and tested a possible relationship between the subtype and symptomatic status. We obtained a total of 40 stool samples identified as positive for Blastocystis by microscopic examination of smears. Participants consisted of 25 symptomatic and 15 asymptomatic patients, for whom clinical and parasitological data were collected. For nested-polymerase chain reaction and genotyping, DNA was extracted directly from fecal samples or from fecal cultures. Morphological forms observed in fecal cultures were uncorrelated with symptomatic status. Genotyping using partial small subunit rRNA gene analysis identified a total of 43 Blastocystis isolates corresponding to 37 single infections and three mixed infections by two different subtypes. These 43 isolates belonged to five subtypes (1, 2, 3, 4, and 7) with predominance of subtype 3 (53.5%). Patient symptomatic status was uncorrelated with Blastocystis subtype.
ISSN 09320113
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2009-03-17
Publisher Place Berlin/Heidelberg
e-ISSN 14321955
Journal Parasitology Research
Volume Number 105
Issue Number 2
Page Count 9
Starting Page 413
Ending Page 421


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Source: SpringerLink