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Author Kowalski, Krzysztof ♦ Bogdziewicz, Michał ♦ Eichert, Urszula ♦ Rychlik, Leszek
Source SpringerLink
Content type Text
Publisher Springer Berlin Heidelberg
File Format PDF
Copyright Year ©2014
Language English
Subject Domain (in DDC) Technology ♦ Medicine & health
Subject Keyword Sex-biased parasitism ♦ Flea abundance ♦ Body mass ♦ Apodemus agrarius ♦ Apodemus flavicollis ♦ Myodes glareolus ♦ Medical Microbiology ♦ Microbiology ♦ Immunology
Abstract Recognizing patterns of parasite distribution among wildlife hosts is of major importance due to growing risk of transmission of zoonotic diseases to humans. Thus, sex-dependent parasite distribution in higher vertebrates is extensively studied, and males are often found more parasitized than females. Male-biased parasitism may be the result of weaker immunocompetence of male hosts owing to the immunosuppressive effect of androgens. Moreover, larger hosts (males) may demonstrate higher parasite infestation levels than smaller individuals (females), as they constitute a better nutritional resource for parasites and provide them with a greater variety of niches. In the present work, we investigated sex-dependent patterns of flea distribution among three common rodent species (Apodemus agrarius, Apodemus flavicollis, and Myodes glareolus). We hypothesized that males have a higher flea infestation than females. We confirm male-biased parasitism in A. agrarius and M. glareolus, but not in A. flavicollis. Additionally, flea infestation increased with body mass in A. agrarius, but not in A. flavicollis and M. glareolus. The detected differences in parasite distribution among sexes are probably the result of immunosuppressive effects of androgens and spatial behavior of males.
ISSN 09320113
Age Range 18 to 22 years ♦ above 22 year
Educational Use Research
Education Level UG and PG
Learning Resource Type Article
Publisher Date 2014-11-21
Publisher Place Berlin/Heidelberg
e-ISSN 14321955
Journal Parasitology Research
Volume Number 114
Issue Number 1
Page Count 5
Starting Page 337
Ending Page 341


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Source: SpringerLink